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Why is Fishing a Dying Sport



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 5th, 2004, 07:08 PM
Bob La Londe
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Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

http://www.yumabassman.com/cgi-bin/y... 47;start=0#0

http://tinyurl.com/ywupp



--
The Security Consultant
http://www.diycomponents.com
Bob La Londe - Owner
849 S Ave C
Yuma, Az 85364

(928)782-9765 ofc
(928)782-7873 fax




  #2  
Old April 5th, 2004, 08:06 PM
Charles Summers
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Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

Dying sport??? Ya gotta be kidding... right?

Please post your opinions here instead of linking to your public forum, then
I'll do some research for Tennessee and show you that it's not declining
here!

"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
s.com...

http://www.yumabassman.com/cgi-bin/y... 47;start=0#0

http://tinyurl.com/ywupp



--
The Security Consultant
http://www.diycomponents.com
Bob La Londe - Owner
849 S Ave C
Yuma, Az 85364

(928)782-9765 ofc
(928)782-7873 fax






  #3  
Old April 5th, 2004, 08:13 PM
Bob La Londe
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Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

"Charles Summers" wrote in message
...
Dying sport??? Ya gotta be kidding... right?


Its not my stats that say license sale sare down.


Please post your opinions here instead of linking to your public forum,

then
I'll do some research for Tennessee and show you that it's not declining
here!


I posted a link because it is a very long rant, but since you requested it
here it is... P.S. Why not post a link anyway? That way those who are
interested can read it and those that aren't don't even download it.

********
The number of fishing license sales has been declining for a decade.
Atleast according to some of the stuff I have read. Guys like Bass Pro
Shops seem to be doing ok because:

They are getting a larger share of the market.
The guys who are still fishing tend to spend more.

I remember fishing places as a kid where we could walk for miles and see few
if any anglers. Sure some very popular fishing areas would have anglers
lined up along a bank shoulder to shoulder, but you could always find a
place to get away. In the last few years I see more and more anglers in the
places I go fishing. I knows it is partly because I have started fishing
tournaments and tend to fish those areas during my recreational fishing as
well for the practice and knowldge it can bring, but still I see a lot of
pressure on the waters I fish. This may seem like it is not a problem, but
when I go to the small hard to get to places that I used to fish before
getting into competition I see nobody at all. Except for stocked ponds the
week after stocking I rarely see people stadning shoulder to shoulder
anymore either although the more popular places are still crowded.

Are the people who fish fishing more?

Seriously. I see the basic premise that there are fewer license sales as an
indication of a very bad problem. I am one of only a handfull of younger
(and by younger I mean under 40) anglers in the local fishing clubs. All of
them combined. Part of this will of course be blamed on baby boomers
getting older, but that can't be the whole picture. There should be a
smaller percentage of younger anglers, but not NONE. (Virtually None)

I have a few questions to think about. Some may help you to promote fishing
in your area if you have any desire to.

Are the anti movements making an impression that is affecting the sport?

Have health advisories dissuaded large numbers of people from fishing?

Has the almost religous zeal of catch and release anglers driven the casual
dinner angler from fishing at all?

Have the proliferation of tournaments made the sport seem like to much for a
casual angler?

Is the arrogance of some a problem for others?

Is society as a whole changing in some way that makes fishing too
inconvenient or unappealling?

Let me now offer some of my own insights. About 20 years ago or a little
more I had an unpleasant experience with a "pro" angler. I was about 16
years old, and the Gila River had been trickling and running often enough
that some decent fish had started to grow. I was fishing minnows, and some
artificials with what I thought was good success. There were miles of river
that were totally unaccessible except by walking and wading. Often you had
to swim or push through heavy brush. I loved it. I was going places nobody
else was going and catching lots of nice fish in spite of of people who said
there weren't any fish in that river.

One day I ran into a local woman who fished the tournaments in Yuma and
other areas, and I was doing a little bragging on how great a fisherman I
thought I was. I probably came off a little strong, but I was proud of my
achievements. She shut me down cold. She basically told me if I wasn't
fishing tournaments and winning I wasn't didly. I didn't know what to think
back then. Now I think, "Wow! What a despicable thing to say to a kid who
is trying hard and seeing some results from it." I really haven't thought
of it over the years. I have for some reason carried a disdain towards
fishing tournaments. Until recently I tried to stay as far away from
tournament anglers as was physically possible without leaving the country.
I probably fished less as well.

A week or so ago I happened to be chatting with one of the construction
supervisors for a general contractor I install a lot of alarm systems for,
and he made a comment that got me thinking. "The arrogance of a lot fo the
jerks fishing the local clubs turned me off from that. I still fish
sometimes, but I sure don't fish with that crowd." I wonder if he fishes as
much as he used to or puts forth the positive image of fishing he might have
if he hadn't been turned off by a "few" tournament anglers?

Now, don't get me wrong. I'm not bashing tournaments or tournament anglers.
I am a tournament angler, and I can see exactly the same thing as has
happened in the past happening still. The same lady pro I mentioned earlier
is still around, and she has managed to alienate one of the young new
anglers in the clubs. I don't know if its her fault because I know the guy
and he can be brash and speak without thinking sometimes, but still. That
is one more angler with a sour taste related to fishing.

How about the overwhelming gaps in knowledge about fishing and the totaL
unwillingness to share anything. I took a guy fishing a few weeks ago. On
the way home I showed him a few of my old bank fishing spots. Guess what!
He has actually gone out fishing on his own and invested some money in his
own equipment since then. We didn't even catch any decent fish when I took
him out. We were friendly, and I listend to his over enthusiastic bravado.
I shared any information I had with him freely.

I have tried to point out some of the causes of what I see as a problem, but
I really haven't stated clearly why I thinks its a problem. After all if
the trend continues and all the 50-75 year old anglers start to die off I'll
have more space on the water for myself when I am that age. Sounds like a
pretty selfish view point doesn't it? I think that is another driving force
behind the problem. I am sure not consciously, but it is there none the
less in many anglers. The flip side of the same thing is that as the
angling population gets older and not enough new anglers join the sport
there will be less opportunity to fish. There will not be enough people to
stand up to industry exploitation of our natural resources. There will not
be enough people to stand up to the antis even if we try and join forces
with trappers and hunters. They are having the same attrition we are.
There will be nobody left to learn from. When my son is forty he will be
able to fish on the local toxic waste pond all by himself, but he'll have to
do it illegally. The antis will persecute him when they see his fishing
tackle and the police will hunt him down and cofiscate his equipment if they
see him using it. Yes it can get that bad. Don't tell me it can't. How
many of you thought there would never be any national gun control laws in
the USA or were told that by the older people you knew?

Even if we do not lose the places and privledges to go fishing very quickly,
there are some other significant and more immediate impacts on the sport.
The sale of some sporting goods carries an excise tax that is suppose to be
used for wildlife maangement. With fewer of us fishing and standing up for
ourselves what is to stop politicians from plundering our money for their
own pork barrel politics. Now something even more immediate. Fishing
license fees are used directly by most state DNR (Department of Natural
Resources) and G&Fs (Game & Fish Departments) to manage the reosurces we
have. These guys use the money to pay enforcement officers, research
biologists, and even the upper level management that interacts with the
politicians and try to protect our lifestyle. With fewer dollars spent on
licenses these departments become dependent on public money. Public money
is supposed to spent where the public most wants it spent. If they aren't
fishing do you think they will lobby their representatives and senators to
spend the money on fisheries management? I really doubt it. Unfortunately
its worse than that. That loss of revenue creates problems today. DNRs and
G&F departments can't field as many officers for enforcement. They can't do
as much research. They have to scale back developent of resources or even
stop managing some. Places to fish are closed to due to secondary pressure
because nobody is there to keep them open. How many places have you seen
closed or restricted after 9/11? One of my favorites is blocked off with K
rail across the road.

This is a real problem. Today! What can we do about it? Casting for Kids
helps some, but I think we need to go further and actually take those kids
fishing. I also think we need to take their parents fishing, because that
is the generation gap thats going to kill the sport. People my age. I
don't see many people my age fishing or joining the sport. We also need to
take each other fishing even though it may damage the usability of our
favorite spots in the short term. Atleast we can still go there.

We need to take a garbage bag with us when we go fishing so we can clean up
for the few jerks that mess things up for everybody else before law
enforcement and government management close off more places to access
because of them.

Learn how to get along with the jet skiers and the speed boaters and the
wakeboarders so that we can enjoin them to help keep our waterways open.
Find a happy middle ground with other public water users. Well, if not
ahppy atleast tolerable.

We have to support the local tackle shops before they all clsoe down. These
guys are often the first line of education for the new guy who wants to go
fishing. Without them how many people are going to take the time to order
equipment blind off the internet to get started on a new hobby much less
make the lifestyle change to make fishing a major part of their lives?

I remember when I was a kid and almost everybody sold fishing tackle.
Sears, JC Penny, Yellow Front, the hardware store down the street, and even
the corner grocery store. we are backing ourselves furhter and further into
a corner and the signs are obvious. What are you going to do about it? Are
you going to enjoy your fishing while you can and let the next generation
deal with your mess? Are you going to go out of your way to share the joys
of fishing with the next generation so that there will be a next generation
of fishermen?
************







"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
s.com...


http://www.yumabassman.com/cgi-bin/y... 47;start=0#0

http://tinyurl.com/ywupp



--
The Security Consultant
http://www.diycomponents.com
Bob La Londe - Owner
849 S Ave C
Yuma, Az 85364

(928)782-9765 ofc
(928)782-7873 fax








  #4  
Old April 5th, 2004, 09:25 PM
go-bassn
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Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

First, fishing is not a dying sport. License sales may be down, but overall
fishing-related revenues have never been higher.

Second, look at local clubs & local hotshots the same way you look at the
local bowling league, the local tavern pool league, the local dart league,
etc... Sure, there are always arrogant, cocky individuals that do well on
that level, and that's fine. That's what it's all about. But the local
softball team isn't about to give the Yankees (of NY) a run for their money.

I've had the good fortune of spending time in and among the pros of bass
fishing, and rest-assured that while most are extremely confident in their
abilities, 99% are oh-so-humble off the water. Daqmn friendly in fact.
Arrogance is non-existent for the most part.

So, we've got a bunch of arrogant, cocky, belittling anglers, bowlers, pool
players, dart throwers, etc. in town, hugh? Does that mean we sit at home &
take up crochet?

Hell no! We go on out there & kick those S.O.B.'s butts.

I joined my first bass club & started fishing tournaments at the ripe old
age of 13 (or so). I remember clearly the elements you speak of. It was
especially impactful on me, being a mere child. The toughest part was
having to deal with having the arrogant jerks kick my butt for a few years.

But it was all part of the learning process & I know for sure that I'm a
much better angler today because of it. You can fish competitively or you
can just fish. If you just fish that's great, and you'll never have to deal
with the egos/mind games associated with tourney fishing.

Not every successful tournament angler flaps his (or her, as the case may
be) mouth. The really good ones let the big, stinky pile of fish in their
weigh-in bags speak for them.

Warren
--
http://www.warrenwolk.com



  #5  
Old April 5th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Charles Summers
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Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

Well said Warren... and yes, license sales ARE down! (More water for us? I
still doubt that.)

California sales in 95 were 1,433,634 compared to last year of 1,179,660.
Pennsylvania sales were 944,004 in 95 compared to 862,057 in 1998.

I've sent an e-mail to the Tennessee Wildlife Agency for Tennessee's figures
for the past ten years, and I'll post that when I get it.

Forget the cocky attitudes... that about ruined tournament fishing for me
after the first year. That's what I love about the ROFB events. Haven't
witnessed any of that at any of our meetings!


"go-bassn" wrote in message
...
First, fishing is not a dying sport. License sales may be down, but

overall
fishing-related revenues have never been higher.

Second, look at local clubs & local hotshots the same way you look at the
local bowling league, the local tavern pool league, the local dart league,
etc... Sure, there are always arrogant, cocky individuals that do well on
that level, and that's fine. That's what it's all about. But the local
softball team isn't about to give the Yankees (of NY) a run for their

money.

I've had the good fortune of spending time in and among the pros of bass
fishing, and rest-assured that while most are extremely confident in their
abilities, 99% are oh-so-humble off the water. Daqmn friendly in fact.
Arrogance is non-existent for the most part.

So, we've got a bunch of arrogant, cocky, belittling anglers, bowlers,

pool
players, dart throwers, etc. in town, hugh? Does that mean we sit at home

&
take up crochet?

Hell no! We go on out there & kick those S.O.B.'s butts.

I joined my first bass club & started fishing tournaments at the ripe old
age of 13 (or so). I remember clearly the elements you speak of. It was
especially impactful on me, being a mere child. The toughest part was
having to deal with having the arrogant jerks kick my butt for a few

years.

But it was all part of the learning process & I know for sure that I'm a
much better angler today because of it. You can fish competitively or you
can just fish. If you just fish that's great, and you'll never have to

deal
with the egos/mind games associated with tourney fishing.

Not every successful tournament angler flaps his (or her, as the case may
be) mouth. The really good ones let the big, stinky pile of fish in their
weigh-in bags speak for them.

Warren
--
http://www.warrenwolk.com





  #6  
Old April 5th, 2004, 10:21 PM
Bob La Londe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

"Charles Summers" wrote in message
...
Well said Warren... and yes, license sales ARE down! (More water for us? I
still doubt that.)


Actually there have been a couple different publications claiming that
license sales nationwide are down. As to more water. No I don't think so.
More water is closed off, and some waters are drawing more of the anglers.
I like to fish ponds and canals from the bank to get away from people
myself. Not many people actually go out and fish in an irrigation ditch
even after I show them pictures of the fish.


California sales in 95 were 1,433,634 compared to last year of 1,179,660.
Pennsylvania sales were 944,004 in 95 compared to 862,057 in 1998.

I've sent an e-mail to the Tennessee Wildlife Agency for Tennessee's

figures
for the past ten years, and I'll post that when I get it.

Forget the cocky attitudes... that about ruined tournament fishing for me
after the first year. That's what I love about the ROFB events. Haven't
witnessed any of that at any of our meetings!


Its not just cocky attitudes. Thats not even why I joined the local clubs.
I joined to learn more stuff, but its not like that at all. Its just
another league game. Heck I played tournament pool for years on a local
level. I went one stretch were I went 1st or 2nd in 27 consecutive bar room
Calcuta tournaments. I don't ever remember being that cocky, and I used to
really enjoy trying to teach somebody who was interested in learning. The
only time I ever got cocky that I remember was when somebody ****ed me off.
Then I'ld just stop talking and play. People found soon that ****ing me off
didn't throw me off my game a bit. Some of the better players around
wouldn't play me except during a tournament because they didn't want me
sharpening my skills against them.

P.S. If one of you guys corners me on a table sometime don't expect a
lesson. I haven't played more than a casual game since 1988. You have to
play everyday if you want to stay good.



"go-bassn" wrote in message
...
First, fishing is not a dying sport. License sales may be down, but

overall
fishing-related revenues have never been higher.

Second, look at local clubs & local hotshots the same way you look at

the
local bowling league, the local tavern pool league, the local dart

league,
etc... Sure, there are always arrogant, cocky individuals that do well

on
that level, and that's fine. That's what it's all about. But the local
softball team isn't about to give the Yankees (of NY) a run for their

money.

I've had the good fortune of spending time in and among the pros of bass
fishing, and rest-assured that while most are extremely confident in

their
abilities, 99% are oh-so-humble off the water. Daqmn friendly in fact.
Arrogance is non-existent for the most part.

So, we've got a bunch of arrogant, cocky, belittling anglers, bowlers,

pool
players, dart throwers, etc. in town, hugh? Does that mean we sit at

home
&
take up crochet?

Hell no! We go on out there & kick those S.O.B.'s butts.

I joined my first bass club & started fishing tournaments at the ripe

old
age of 13 (or so). I remember clearly the elements you speak of. It

was
especially impactful on me, being a mere child. The toughest part was
having to deal with having the arrogant jerks kick my butt for a few

years.

But it was all part of the learning process & I know for sure that I'm a
much better angler today because of it. You can fish competitively or

you
can just fish. If you just fish that's great, and you'll never have to

deal
with the egos/mind games associated with tourney fishing.

Not every successful tournament angler flaps his (or her, as the case

may
be) mouth. The really good ones let the big, stinky pile of fish in

their
weigh-in bags speak for them.

Warren
--
http://www.warrenwolk.com







  #7  
Old April 5th, 2004, 10:43 PM
Steve @ OutdoorFrontiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport


"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
s.com...

http://www.yumabassman.com/cgi-bin/y... 47;start=0#0

http://tinyurl.com/ywupp


Unfortunately, fishing as it stands right now is a dying sport. Unless more
people take the bull by the horns and do something about it, that trend is
going to continue.

Part of the problem (as I see it) is that the majority of the people
participating in fishing are males in the 35 to 55 year old age bracket (my
generation). As a whole, we are dying off, or getting too involved in our
jobs, or wrapped up in something other than fishing. So, as a segment of
the fishing population, we are losing numbers every year.

The next largest age group is the one that is comprised of our parents, the
55 and older generation, the ones that loved to fish and taught us to do the
same. We're losing people from this generation on an increasingly faster
rate. Their health is failing, so they can't get out, their income is fixed
and if it becomes a choice of going on a fishing trip or buying the next
week's supply of medication, guess which gets dropped? And, this generation
is just plain dying, reducing our ranks.

The following generation, that of our children, have to be the ones to fill
the dwindling levels. And I don't see that happening without direct
intervention. The 16 to 35 year old age bracket, as a whole is part of what
I call the "ME Generation". These are the ones that want everything NOW,
without a learning curve. They want instant gratification and don't see
fishing as exciting as we do. This generation is more into partying,
computer games, video and spending money on glitz and glamour. They're
about the bottom line and what's in it for me? They want it all and they
don't want to work for it. Spend time in a boat??? Casting a lure
repeatedly??? Maybe catching a two pound fish once in a while??? I don't
think so! I can fire up Trophy Bass ver. XXIIC and catch 15 pound bass from
the comfort of my desk chair.

This is the generation that, more than ever, grew up as children of divorced
parents. Most of them didn't have a father figure that would take them out
fishing on the weekends. A good percentage of this generation doesn't know
how to fish, period!

These are the same people that I see in my boat, brought there by their
father or mother, and are slightly sullen about the whole thing. They don't
know the first thing about the sport, and it's quite fun for me to watch
their eyes open, and their attitude change as the day progresses. What they
originally did to "humor the old man", now becomes something real,
interesting and challenging, it becomes fun!

We need to get this group, and the ones coming up behind them out on the
water. We need to get them to know how much fun fishing really is. We need
to get them off their ever widening behinds and out in the fresh air and
open their minds, eyes and hearts to the outdoors. We can't do this by
hoarding our knowledge, our favorite fishing spots and being secretive.
Invite the neighbor kid along, a nephew, a niece, your wife, your kids.
Take them along and make the day fun, let them know that fishing can be an
enjoyable sport, let them see that there's more to it than sitting quietly
in a boat staring at a bobber.

Tournament fishing is great, it exposes a large group of people to fishing.
But, WE need to get more women and young people exposed to and involved in
the outdoor world. Unless WE take the responsibility to teach the next
generation that there is more to the world than a computer/tv screen,
numbers are going to continue to go down.

That's my take on it anyway.
--
Steve @ OutdoorFrontiers
http://www.outdoorfrontiers.com
G & S Guide Service and Custom Rods
http://www.herefishyfishy.com


  #8  
Old April 5th, 2004, 10:54 PM
Bob La Londe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

But, WE need to get more women and young people exposed to and involved in
the outdoor world. Unless WE take the responsibility to teach the next
generation that there is more to the world than a computer/tv screen,
numbers are going to continue to go down.


And here I sit in front of my computer screen conversing with gentlemen
around the country instead of out doing service calls and making money to
support my hobby. LOL.



That's my take on it anyway.
--
Steve @ OutdoorFrontiers
http://www.outdoorfrontiers.com
G & S Guide Service and Custom Rods
http://www.herefishyfishy.com




  #9  
Old April 5th, 2004, 11:02 PM
John Kerr
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport

Just a personal thought on the subject. I don't tihnk the decline has
anything to do with tournaments, pros, attitutdues, or any of that.
Attitudes have been around since the cave man, and will probably be
around till our sun leaves the " main scene" .
I believe it is a changing of the times as much as anything. Young peope
have so many more choices of leisure activities now days than years ago.
Plus the young adults find themselves in a 2 income family for the most
part, and when time off happens for the working wife and husband, they
often want to spend it together doing other leisure activities...not
that there are not some husband and wife fishing buddies, just not that
many. Fishing also use to be a bit easier to do...not as many
restrictions, and more accesable water in many places. Now in some parts
of the country, you have to have a license, a lake permit, and even pay
parking in a few! So it is becoming easier for the young people to opt
for other entertainment. It makes sense to me that fishing would always
be on a decline per capita...the days of the "hunter / gather" are fast
giving way to being "supplied" with lifes essential grin.
JK

  #10  
Old April 5th, 2004, 11:12 PM
Steve @ OutdoorFrontiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is Fishing a Dying Sport


"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
s.com...
But, WE need to get more women and young people exposed to and involved

in
the outdoor world. Unless WE take the responsibility to teach the next
generation that there is more to the world than a computer/tv screen,
numbers are going to continue to go down.


And here I sit in front of my computer screen conversing with gentlemen
around the country instead of out doing service calls and making money to
support my hobby. LOL.


LOL, I agree, it is ironic, isn't it? And here I am, working feverishly on
getting a television show and website going, with the intention of getting
more women and young people involved. It's kind of a Catch-22, I want
people to watch the show, and participate on the website, but I want them to
get away from the television and computer and get outdoors.

Oh well, what's a person to do? Oh yeah, go fishing and take someone with
you!
--
Steve @ OutdoorFrontiers
http://www.outdoorfrontiers.com
G & S Guide Service and Custom Rods
http://www.herefishyfishy.com


 




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