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Fishing for Trout in the Summer?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 5th, 2004, 01:38 AM
Marty
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Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty

  #2  
Old June 5th, 2004, 06:52 PM
North Star
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

Hi Marty,

The answer to your question depends on where you want to fish. If you fish
rivers and streams, you should be able to catch trout all summer long. River
and stream based trout have a diet that is mostly insects that fall into the
water. A spinning rod with worms, corn or salmon eggs with or without a
bobber should get you some Trout. If you pursue fishing enough, you can
learn to fly fish too.

If you are fishing in a Lake, I'm afraid you are out of luck in the summer
time. I do not know about what baitfish are available in California waters,
but here in New Hampshire the main food staple for lake dwelling Trout are
Rainbow Smelt. In the spring, these Smelt spawn and are near the surface and
shore. Naturally the Trout follow the food and thus the ease of catching
them without a boat. When summer hits, the lake "turns over" and a
thermocline develops. This is a layer of cooler water under the warmer
surface layer. This can mean that trout will be 30-50 feet down or more.
Both the Trout and Smelt have oxygen requirements that prohibit them from
spending much if any time on the surface. Warmer water does not hold as much
oxygen in it as cold water does. So until fall arives and the lakes cool
off, the fish will stay deep. Fishing off shore will yield nothing in
Summer. You will need a boat equipped with downriggers.

Hope that helped.

Harry
Lisenced New Hampshire Fishing Guide

www.northstarguide.com




"Marty" wrote in message
. com...
I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty



  #3  
Old June 5th, 2004, 09:30 PM
Marty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

North Star wrote:

Hi Marty,

The answer to your question depends on where you want to fish. If you fish
rivers and streams, you should be able to catch trout all summer long. River
and stream based trout have a diet that is mostly insects that fall into the
water. A spinning rod with worms, corn or salmon eggs with or without a
bobber should get you some Trout. If you pursue fishing enough, you can
learn to fly fish too.

If you are fishing in a Lake, I'm afraid you are out of luck in the summer
time. I do not know about what baitfish are available in California waters,
but here in New Hampshire the main food staple for lake dwelling Trout are
Rainbow Smelt. In the spring, these Smelt spawn and are near the surface and
shore. Naturally the Trout follow the food and thus the ease of catching
them without a boat. When summer hits, the lake "turns over" and a
thermocline develops. This is a layer of cooler water under the warmer
surface layer. This can mean that trout will be 30-50 feet down or more.
Both the Trout and Smelt have oxygen requirements that prohibit them from
spending much if any time on the surface. Warmer water does not hold as much
oxygen in it as cold water does. So until fall arives and the lakes cool
off, the fish will stay deep. Fishing off shore will yield nothing in
Summer. You will need a boat equipped with downriggers.

Hope that helped.

Harry
Lisenced New Hampshire Fishing Guide

www.northstarguide.com




"Marty" wrote in message
. com...

I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty




Harry, That helps a lot!

What is available in lakes for shore fishing in the summer? Bluegill?
Bass? Anything catchable without mortgaging the house will do. I just
want to take advantage of my just turned teens interest in fishing.
He'll need some rewards though, to keep him interested.

Marty


  #4  
Old June 6th, 2004, 02:28 AM
Jerry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

Marty wrote:
I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty


Marty for the most part in your area of the country trout will go deeper
in the summer which usually calls for a boat and trolling gear. This is
not to say trout are not available for the shore fisherman. What you
will need to look for is a shore area with a steep slope going onto the
water. Two lakes in your area are Lake Berryessa and Clear lake which
has good trout populations and they are also planted through out the
year. A little more north is Collins lake that has very good fishing
access above the damn for the person on shore as is Lake Amador lake.
The sliding sinker rig is pretty much standard for trout except in the
early to late spring I have had a ball catching trout under a bobber
around the tulle banks of Clear Lake. If you have the time to scout
them out don't forget about the high elevation lakes up in the Tahoe
National Forest area that has good fishing all summer long from the bank
plus some fine camping. If you have the place to keep one a little 12
or 14 foot used aluminum boat with 9-15 hp motor is really all you need
for the smaller lakes mentioned and can really add to your fishing
enjoyment. I no longer live in California, loved the fishing, weather,
and places of interest but hated the prices and politics.

Jerry

  #5  
Old June 6th, 2004, 01:24 PM
North Star
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

Absolutely!!!

Bass, Bluegill, Perch, Pickerel any of those warm water species will give
you plenty of action all summer long.

Personally, I don't often fish for warm water species, but if you want to
get a kid involved it is imperative to start here. I don't know how old your
boy is, but to keep a kid interested they have to see results once in a
while, and warm water fish will give you some guaranteed action. Kids are
not like us adults, where a bad day fishing is still better than a good day
working.

Because Bass and other warm water species do not have the high oxygen
requirements of the trout family, they can be found in shallow areas of the
lakes all summer. Try coves, inlets, by docks, weeds, fallen trees,
boulders, any thing that gives them some cover. Bass are predators and need
hiding spots to strike out at unsuspecting bait passing by.

From here the best advice I can give you is to go to some local bait and
tackle shops and talk to the guys in there. They know the waters and where
the fish are and what to use to get them. Any time I fish in unfamiliar
waters, the local bait shops are the first place I go.

Good luck to you and your boy!

Harry


"Marty" wrote in message
. com...
North Star wrote:

Hi Marty,

The answer to your question depends on where you want to fish. If you

fish
rivers and streams, you should be able to catch trout all summer long.

River
and stream based trout have a diet that is mostly insects that fall into

the
water. A spinning rod with worms, corn or salmon eggs with or without a
bobber should get you some Trout. If you pursue fishing enough, you can
learn to fly fish too.

If you are fishing in a Lake, I'm afraid you are out of luck in the

summer
time. I do not know about what baitfish are available in California

waters,
but here in New Hampshire the main food staple for lake dwelling Trout

are
Rainbow Smelt. In the spring, these Smelt spawn and are near the surface

and
shore. Naturally the Trout follow the food and thus the ease of catching
them without a boat. When summer hits, the lake "turns over" and a
thermocline develops. This is a layer of cooler water under the warmer
surface layer. This can mean that trout will be 30-50 feet down or more.
Both the Trout and Smelt have oxygen requirements that prohibit them

from
spending much if any time on the surface. Warmer water does not hold as

much
oxygen in it as cold water does. So until fall arives and the lakes cool
off, the fish will stay deep. Fishing off shore will yield nothing in
Summer. You will need a boat equipped with downriggers.

Hope that helped.

Harry
Lisenced New Hampshire Fishing Guide

www.northstarguide.com




"Marty" wrote in message
. com...

I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty




Harry, That helps a lot!

What is available in lakes for shore fishing in the summer? Bluegill?
Bass? Anything catchable without mortgaging the house will do. I just
want to take advantage of my just turned teens interest in fishing.
He'll need some rewards though, to keep him interested.

Marty




  #6  
Old June 6th, 2004, 05:48 PM
Marty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

North Star wrote:

Absolutely!!!

Bass, Bluegill, Perch, Pickerel any of those warm water species will give
you plenty of action all summer long.

Personally, I don't often fish for warm water species, but if you want to
get a kid involved it is imperative to start here. I don't know how old your
boy is, but to keep a kid interested they have to see results once in a
while, and warm water fish will give you some guaranteed action. Kids are
not like us adults, where a bad day fishing is still better than a good day
working.

Because Bass and other warm water species do not have the high oxygen
requirements of the trout family, they can be found in shallow areas of the
lakes all summer. Try coves, inlets, by docks, weeds, fallen trees,
boulders, any thing that gives them some cover. Bass are predators and need
hiding spots to strike out at unsuspecting bait passing by.

From here the best advice I can give you is to go to some local bait and
tackle shops and talk to the guys in there. They know the waters and where
the fish are and what to use to get them. Any time I fish in unfamiliar
waters, the local bait shops are the first place I go.

Good luck to you and your boy!

Harry


"Marty" wrote in message
. com...

North Star wrote:


Hi Marty,

The answer to your question depends on where you want to fish. If you


fish

rivers and streams, you should be able to catch trout all summer long.


River

and stream based trout have a diet that is mostly insects that fall into


the

water. A spinning rod with worms, corn or salmon eggs with or without a
bobber should get you some Trout. If you pursue fishing enough, you can
learn to fly fish too.

If you are fishing in a Lake, I'm afraid you are out of luck in the


summer

time. I do not know about what baitfish are available in California


waters,

but here in New Hampshire the main food staple for lake dwelling Trout


are

Rainbow Smelt. In the spring, these Smelt spawn and are near the surface


and

shore. Naturally the Trout follow the food and thus the ease of catching
them without a boat. When summer hits, the lake "turns over" and a
thermocline develops. This is a layer of cooler water under the warmer
surface layer. This can mean that trout will be 30-50 feet down or more.
Both the Trout and Smelt have oxygen requirements that prohibit them


from

spending much if any time on the surface. Warmer water does not hold as


much

oxygen in it as cold water does. So until fall arives and the lakes cool
off, the fish will stay deep. Fishing off shore will yield nothing in
Summer. You will need a boat equipped with downriggers.

Hope that helped.

Harry
Lisenced New Hampshire Fishing Guide

www.northstarguide.com




"Marty" wrote in message
gy.com...


I'm trying to learn how to fish. I want to fish for trout. I'm in
California a little north of San Francisco.

Everything I read talks about fishing when the water's cold (winter,
early spring) or using gear that goes deep from a boat if I want to fish
in the summer. I don't have a boat and I don't want to rent one every
time I take my kid fishing.

I thought I used to go fishing in the summer when I was a kid and I used
to catch trout. I never used anything fancy, just a treble hook with
eggs or cheese, maybe a worm (not usually).

Am I wrong in thinking that I can catch trout from shore with a sliding
sinker/swivel/leader/treble hook/cheese, power bait, eggs or with a
bobber instead of a sliding sinker?

Don't trout need to eat in the summer, too? Or are they only dining at
the finer deep water establishments?

If I insist on fishing lakes from the banks, is it a crack of dawn thing
and a last rays of sunlight thing?

While you're answering this, I'll try to remember how to tie a knot.

Thanks,

Marty




Harry, That helps a lot!

What is available in lakes for shore fishing in the summer? Bluegill?
Bass? Anything catchable without mortgaging the house will do. I just
want to take advantage of my just turned teens interest in fishing.
He'll need some rewards though, to keep him interested.

Marty





Thanks! We'll give the warm water species a shot this summer.

And we'll head for Jerry's recommended spots while we're at it, and
definitely once the weather changes to the cooler side next fall/winter.
We have plenty of comfortable winter days in California, so there's no
reason to not go fishing during the winter here.

Still, fishing for me has that huck finn/tom sawyer aesthetic attached
to it: drop a line in the water on a lazy summer day and just hang
around doing little of anything and maybe catch a fish or two for aunt
polly. And if I get a big one, I'll show it to Becky and see if she's
impressed.

Marty

  #7  
Old June 9th, 2004, 07:19 AM
LT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

Check the DFG website http://www.dfg.ca.gov/fishplant/index.html for their
stocking schedule.
LT


  #8  
Old June 10th, 2004, 06:36 AM
Marty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fishing for Trout in the Summer?

LT wrote:
Check the DFG website http://www.dfg.ca.gov/fishplant/index.html for their
stocking schedule.
LT


Thanks for the link, LT.

Marty

 




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