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Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won'tadmit to



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 11th, 2008, 12:34 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
ANTIQUE AUDIO
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Posts: 6
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won'tadmit to

heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated

basically the only reason people used them, was back in 1900, there
was nothing else- only baitcasters and fly reels- spinning and
spincasting reels were not invented yet

anyone that says they can "cast further with a baitcaster" is FOS-
think about it, use common sense

on a spinning reel, the only thing that has to leave the reel, is the
line itself

on a baitcaster, the spool has to turn

there is more friction turning the spool, than the line just leaving
the spinning reel

so there you have it

why do people use them ? for the same reason they like 1970
Chevelles, tube stereos, and battleships- they are a cool relic of the
past

truth be told, there's not a freshwater fish alive, you can't land
with a spinning or spincasting reel

the only "practical" sane use for a baitcaster, is deep see fishing or
trolling, for very, very big fish- like swordfish- and trolling- where
you toss your bait over the side, let line out, and troll the lure

sure, there are people that can cast 100-150 ft. with a baitcaster

but even a novice can cast 250 feet with a spinning reel-

there's simply no comparison- but for some reason, these "bass pros"
won't admit to that-

reason- they are getting cash endorsements from reel companies- and
the reel companies make a ton of money from baitcasting reels people
use a few times, have problems with, then sit and collect dust

just look at how many old baitcasting reels there are on Ebay. Just
try casting with one. The old baitcasters had no clutch, drag, or
casting resistance settings- all they had was a clicker button-

the clicker served as a half-assed "drag" to wear down a fish, and an
"alarm" to tell the fisherman, when a fish has hit his lure while
trolling

NOT for casting, or for clutching

the recent additions of the clutch, drag, release button, etc.
settings, was merely an attempt at making a reel designed for cranking
a big fish in, to also cast

having said this, I have spent last 2 days practicing casting an old
1960's vintage baitcaster reel, the reel handle actually spins when
casted, there is no release button on it- maximum casting range so far
is 60 feet- that's about it
  #2  
Old August 11th, 2008, 01:22 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Ronnie
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Posts: 549
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companieswon't admit to

So if I decide to get into long distance casting contest I will get a
big spinning reel.

To each his own - you use whatever you want to use and I will, too.

Ronnie

http://fishing.about.com

  #3  
Old August 11th, 2008, 02:39 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
RichZ
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Posts: 191
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companieswon't admit to

ANTIQUE AUDIO wrote:
heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated

basically the only reason people used them, was back in 1900, there
was nothing else- only baitcasters and fly reels- spinning and
spincasting reels were not invented yet

anyone that says they can "cast further with a baitcaster" is FOS-
think about it, use common sense

on a spinning reel, the only thing that has to leave the reel, is the
line itself

on a baitcaster, the spool has to turn

there is more friction turning the spool, than the line just leaving
the spinning reel

so there you have it

why do people use them ? for the same reason they like 1970
Chevelles, tube stereos, and battleships- they are a cool relic of the
past

truth be told, there's not a freshwater fish alive, you can't land
with a spinning or spincasting reel

the only "practical" sane use for a baitcaster, is deep see fishing or
trolling, for very, very big fish- like swordfish- and trolling- where
you toss your bait over the side, let line out, and troll the lure

sure, there are people that can cast 100-150 ft. with a baitcaster

but even a novice can cast 250 feet with a spinning reel-

there's simply no comparison- but for some reason, these "bass pros"
won't admit to that-

reason- they are getting cash endorsements from reel companies- and
the reel companies make a ton of money from baitcasting reels people
use a few times, have problems with, then sit and collect dust

just look at how many old baitcasting reels there are on Ebay. Just
try casting with one. The old baitcasters had no clutch, drag, or
casting resistance settings- all they had was a clicker button-

the clicker served as a half-assed "drag" to wear down a fish, and an
"alarm" to tell the fisherman, when a fish has hit his lure while
trolling

NOT for casting, or for clutching

the recent additions of the clutch, drag, release button, etc.
settings, was merely an attempt at making a reel designed for cranking
a big fish in, to also cast

having said this, I have spent last 2 days practicing casting an old
1960's vintage baitcaster reel, the reel handle actually spins when
casted, there is no release button on it- maximum casting range so far
is 60 feet- that's about it

  #4  
Old August 11th, 2008, 12:20 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Craig M
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Posts: 4
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won't admit to

Gonna put my 2 cents worth in he
Baitcasters have one advantage, size, its a smaller reel, fits better in the
hand, you can feel the strike better when your hand is wrapped arround the
reel and rod seat, then you ever can with a spinning reel, I do have and use
both types, I use spinning when fishing tiny lures, and when beach fishing
once in a while, I have a 9 foot surf rod and a big spinning reel, also have
a 6` harbormaster with a Penn 209, and have brought in some mighty big
redfish with it, oh yes, I cast it pretty good too.
"ANTIQUE AUDIO" wrote in message
...
heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated

basically the only reason people used them, was back in 1900, there
was nothing else- only baitcasters and fly reels- spinning and
spincasting reels were not invented yet

anyone that says they can "cast further with a baitcaster" is FOS-
think about it, use common sense

on a spinning reel, the only thing that has to leave the reel, is the
line itself

on a baitcaster, the spool has to turn

there is more friction turning the spool, than the line just leaving
the spinning reel

so there you have it

why do people use them ? for the same reason they like 1970
Chevelles, tube stereos, and battleships- they are a cool relic of the
past

truth be told, there's not a freshwater fish alive, you can't land
with a spinning or spincasting reel

the only "practical" sane use for a baitcaster, is deep see fishing or
trolling, for very, very big fish- like swordfish- and trolling- where
you toss your bait over the side, let line out, and troll the lure

sure, there are people that can cast 100-150 ft. with a baitcaster

but even a novice can cast 250 feet with a spinning reel-

there's simply no comparison- but for some reason, these "bass pros"
won't admit to that-

reason- they are getting cash endorsements from reel companies- and
the reel companies make a ton of money from baitcasting reels people
use a few times, have problems with, then sit and collect dust

just look at how many old baitcasting reels there are on Ebay. Just
try casting with one. The old baitcasters had no clutch, drag, or
casting resistance settings- all they had was a clicker button-

the clicker served as a half-assed "drag" to wear down a fish, and an
"alarm" to tell the fisherman, when a fish has hit his lure while
trolling

NOT for casting, or for clutching

the recent additions of the clutch, drag, release button, etc.
settings, was merely an attempt at making a reel designed for cranking
a big fish in, to also cast

having said this, I have spent last 2 days practicing casting an old
1960's vintage baitcaster reel, the reel handle actually spins when
casted, there is no release button on it- maximum casting range so far
is 60 feet- that's about it



  #5  
Old August 11th, 2008, 02:05 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
AJ[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won't admit to

If you've spent 2 days with an old one, I can understand your venting. I
have an old South Bend reel from my Dad like that and enjoy a good laugh
whenever I clean it and try it out. BTW, those old reels were intended
for the old style braided lines.

With modern baitcaster, I have to disagree about casting distance. In my
experience it's limited primarily by rod length and action, lure weight,
and wind resistance, not by the type of reel. If a baitcaster is set
right on the verge of over-run, I.e. you can see loose coils of line
around the spool during the cast, the reel isn't slowing down the lure
or shortening the cast. While it's impractical, for me at least, to fish
that way all day, just a very slight increase of the cast control
eliminates the loose coils, shortening the cast by a few feet.

I do fish with both kinds, but actually have more tangles with a
spinning reel usually related to line twist. It's a good thing most
spinning reels come with spare spools! And while I wouldn't bother with
a tube stereo, I do have a couple of tube guitar amps & wouldn't have it
any other way ;-)


In article [email protected]
25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com, says...
heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated

basically the only reason people used them, was back in 1900, there
was nothing else- only baitcasters and fly reels- spinning and
spincasting reels were not invented yet

anyone that says they can "cast further with a baitcaster" is FOS-
think about it, use common sense

on a spinning reel, the only thing that has to leave the reel, is the
line itself

on a baitcaster, the spool has to turn

there is more friction turning the spool, than the line just leaving
the spinning reel

so there you have it

why do people use them ? for the same reason they like 1970
Chevelles, tube stereos, and battleships- they are a cool relic of the
past

truth be told, there's not a freshwater fish alive, you can't land
with a spinning or spincasting reel

the only "practical" sane use for a baitcaster, is deep see fishing or
trolling, for very, very big fish- like swordfish- and trolling- where
you toss your bait over the side, let line out, and troll the lure

sure, there are people that can cast 100-150 ft. with a baitcaster

but even a novice can cast 250 feet with a spinning reel-

there's simply no comparison- but for some reason, these "bass pros"
won't admit to that-

reason- they are getting cash endorsements from reel companies- and
the reel companies make a ton of money from baitcasting reels people
use a few times, have problems with, then sit and collect dust

just look at how many old baitcasting reels there are on Ebay. Just
try casting with one. The old baitcasters had no clutch, drag, or
casting resistance settings- all they had was a clicker button-

the clicker served as a half-assed "drag" to wear down a fish, and an
"alarm" to tell the fisherman, when a fish has hit his lure while
trolling

NOT for casting, or for clutching

the recent additions of the clutch, drag, release button, etc.
settings, was merely an attempt at making a reel designed for cranking
a big fish in, to also cast

having said this, I have spent last 2 days practicing casting an old
1960's vintage baitcaster reel, the reel handle actually spins when
casted, there is no release button on it- maximum casting range so far
is 60 feet- that's about it

  #6  
Old August 11th, 2008, 02:28 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
ANTIQUE AUDIO
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default the reason baitcaster handles on right hand wind-reels wereoriginally turned over to crank in

On Aug 10, 7:34*pm, ANTIQUE AUDIO wrote:
heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated

basically the only reason people used them, was back in 1900, there
was nothing else- only baitcasters and fly reels- spinning and
spincasting reels were not invented yet

anyone that says they can "cast further with a baitcaster" is FOS-
think about it, use common sense

on a spinning reel, the only thing that has to leave the reel, is the
line itself

on a baitcaster, the spool has to turn

there is more friction turning the spool, than the line just leaving
the spinning reel

so there you have it

why do people use them ? *for the same reason they like 1970
Chevelles, tube stereos, and battleships- they are a cool relic of the
past

truth be told, there's not a freshwater fish alive, you can't land
with a spinning or spincasting reel

the only "practical" sane use for a baitcaster, is deep see fishing or
trolling, for very, very big fish- like swordfish- and trolling- where
you toss your bait over the side, let line out, and troll the lure

sure, there are people that can cast 100-150 ft. with a baitcaster

but even a novice can cast 250 feet with a spinning reel-

there's simply no comparison- but for some reason, these "bass pros"
won't admit to that-

reason- they are getting cash endorsements from reel companies- and
the reel companies make a ton of money from baitcasting reels people
use a few times, have problems with, then sit and collect dust

just look at how many old baitcasting reels there are on Ebay. *Just
try casting with one. The old baitcasters had no clutch, drag, or
casting resistance settings- all they had was a clicker button-

the clicker served as a half-assed "drag" to wear down a fish, and an
"alarm" to tell the fisherman, when a fish has hit his lure while
trolling

NOT for casting, or for clutching

the recent additions of the clutch, drag, release button, etc.
settings, was merely an attempt at making a reel designed for cranking
a big fish in, to also cast

having said this, I have spent last 2 days practicing casting an old
1960's vintage baitcaster reel, the reel handle actually spins when
casted, there is no release button on it- maximum casting range so far
is 60 feet- that's about it


first baitcasters were made in the 1600's- we are talking a 400 year
old design

by comparison, the first spinning reels were invented in the 1870's-
the primary purpose of a spinning reel ? eliminate backlash, and to
cast lighter weight lures

it's common knowledge that baitcasters don't work well with light
lures

see it here

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing...t_casting_reel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing..._spool.29_reel

"Early reels were often operated by inverting the reel and using back
winding to retrieve line. For this reason, the reel crank handle was
positioned on the right side of the reel.[2] As a result, the right-
hand crank position for bait casting reels has become customary over
the years"

so the reason the crank handle is on the wrong side, is back 200 years
ago, they turned the reel over to crank it in with left hand- now, is
that a good reason to have the crank on right side today ? NO, it
isn't

you have to use common sense with this stuff- a lot of things we are
sold and told today, are done for political and economic (i.e. money)
reasons

Bait casting reel
Bait casting reels are reels in which line is stored on a bearing
supported revolving spool. The bait casting reel is mounted above the
rod, hence its other name, the overhead reel. The bait casting reel
dates from at least the mid-1600s, but came into wide use by amateur
anglers during the 1870s. Early bait casting reels were often
constructed with brass or iron gears, with casings and spools made of
brass, German silver, or hard rubber. Early reels were often operated
by inverting the reel and using back winding to retrieve line. For
this reason, the reel crank handle was positioned on the right side of
the reel.[2] As a result, the right-hand crank position for bait
casting reels has become customary over the years, though models with
left-hand retrieve are now gaining in popularity. Many of today's bait
casting reels are constructed using aluminum, stainless steel, and/or
synthetic composite materials. They typically include a level-wind
mechanism to prevent the line from being trapped under itself on the
spool during rewind and interfering with subsequent casts. Many are
also fitted with anti-reverse handles and drags designed to slow runs
by large and powerful game fish. Because the momentum of the forward
cast must rotate the spool as well as propel the fishing lure, bait
casting designs normally require heavier lures for proper operation
than with other types of reels. The gear ratio in bait casting reels
was initially about 3/1, later standardized at 4/1 in most reels, but
recent developments have seen many bait casting reels with gear ratios
as high as 5.5/1 or even higher. Higher gear ratios allow much faster
retrieval of line, but sacrifice a small amount of power in exchange.

Spool tension on most modern bait casting reels can be adjusted with
adjustable spool tension, a centrifugal brake, or a magnetic "cast
control." This reduces spool overrun during a cast and the resultant
line snare, known as backlash. Each time a lure of a different weight
is attached, the cast control must be adjusted. The bait casting reel
design will operate well with a wide variety of fishing lines, ranging
from braided multifilament and heat-fused "superlines" to copolymer,
fluorocarbon, and nylon monofilaments (see Fishing line). Most bait
casting reels can also easily be palmed or thumbed to increase the
drag, set the hook, or to accurately halt the lure at a given point in
the cast.

A variation of the bait casting reel is the big game reel. These are
very large and robust fishing reels, designed and built for heavy
sal****er species such as tuna, marlin, sailfish and sharks. Big game
reels are not designed for casting, but used for trolling or fishing
set baits and lures on the open ocean.

Bait casting reels are sometimes referred to as conventional reels in
the U.S. They are known as multiplier reels in Europe, on account of
their geared line retrieve (one turn of the handle resulting in
multiple turns of the spool).

Bait Casting Reel Operation
A bait casting reel and rod is cast by moving the rod backward, then
snapping it forward. During the forward cast, the weight of the lure
pulls the line off the reel. The thumb is used to halt the lure at the
desired location and to prevent spool overrun. Though modern
centrifigal braking systems help to control backlash, using a bait
casting reel still requires practice, and a certain amount of finesse
on the part of the fisherman for best results.


  #7  
Old August 11th, 2008, 02:37 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Guy Anderson, Sr.
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Posts: 29
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won't admit to

On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 16:34:52 -0700 (PDT), ANTIQUE AUDIO
wrote:

heads up people- baitcaster reels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated.......snips.........


My head has been up regarding reels for over 50 years, and for
absolute accuracy and careful presentation, modern baitcasters are
FAR superior to spinning reels. That said, I use both because both
serve their intended purposes extremely well.
  #8  
Old August 11th, 2008, 04:55 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Mike Getz
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Posts: 40
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companies won't admit to

" the reel handle actually spins when casted, there is no release button on
it- maximum casting range so far is 60 feet- that's about it"

My Dad used one and I always called it the knuckle buster AND he used a
braided type of line.


  #9  
Old August 18th, 2008, 12:59 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
ANTIQUE AUDIO
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companieswon't admit to

On Aug 11, 11:55*am, "Mike Getz" wrote:
" the reel handle actually spins when casted, there is no release button on
it- maximum casting range so far *is 60 feet- that's about it"

My Dad used one and I always called it the knuckle buster AND he used a
braided type of line.




I was reading a "freshwater fishing" hardcover reference book- it
states right there in black and white- a spinning reel will cast much
further, a lot easier, with no backlash problems- than any baitcaster
will

what we have with spinning vs. baitcasting reels is, 2 different
schools of thought- the baitcaster was a descendant of the 1800's
"Kentucky" reel and invented in USA- the spinning reel was invented in
Europe in early 1900's

the spinning reel will handle lighter lures and lighter lines, for
catching cunning fish that won't bite if they see the line- current
spinning rods/reels are designed for 12 lb. test or heavier- plenty
for any bass fisherman

where the baitcaster comes into play is very LARGE fish 15-20 pounds
or larger, where the strong reel design and winch action will wear
down/horse in a large fish with less strain

using a baitcaster reel to catch 3 lb. fish is really overkill, like
swatting a fly with a sledgehammer. Sure it will work, but a
flyswatter is a lot lighter and more efficient and less hassle to
use. The thicker line required on a baitcaster to prevent backlash,
will limit strikes on wary fish like trout- I've gone from 4 lb. to 6
lb. test on my spinning reel and got less trout strikes- that's just
how sensitive those fish are to line size and natural drift of bait- a
heavy line turns them off

casting distance- no comparison- I can cast 2-3 times further with a
cheap open face spinning reel, over any baitcaster reel made

baitcasters are much like golf clubs, you use the same cast force with
every lure, but heavier lures will go further than light lures will-
just like a golfer uses same stroke every time, with a different club-
try to cast a baitcaster harder, it will just backlash worse- casting
it smoothly and with even pressure, actually makes it cast further-
and I can cast much further with a sidearm cast, then overhead pitching
  #10  
Old August 18th, 2008, 02:55 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
ANTIQUE AUDIO
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Baitcasting reels-the attractive antique that reel companieswon't admit to

On Aug 11, 9:37*am, "Guy Anderson, Sr."
wrote:
On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 16:34:52 -0700 (PDT), ANTIQUE AUDIO

wrote:
heads up people-baitcasterreels are older than the Ford Model T, and
just as antiquated.......snips.........


My head has been up regarding reels for over 50 years, and for
absolute accuracy and careful presentation, *modern baitcasters are
FAR superior to spinning reels. *That said, I use both because both
serve their intended purposes extremely well.


this statement needs to be qualified- more accurate, but how far of a
cast, with what weight line ?

I've been using spinning reels for 40 years- and fishing some very
difficult, covered streams with them- where any type of overhead cast
means you're stuck in a tree branch above you due to cover brush- and
using 4-6 lb. test lines- there's simply no way a baitcaster can do
that

try casting a baitcaster with 2 mealie grubs for bait on a hook, with
4 lb. line. A spinning reel does it effortlessly

the basic design of a baitcaster, makes it less accurate, not more
accurate. The reel spool turning and putting drag on the lure, and
requiring thumb pressure to prevent backlash, isn't helping accuracy.
You can pitch a spinning reel lure the same as a baitcaster, with no
backlash and with thinner line, and lighter weight lure-and not have
to thumb the spool.

the baitcaster needs to equal/best a spinning reel in all respects,
if it's going to be "better"

the same amount of practice would yield same accuracy with spinning
reel, and the spinning reel has more distance- one can master a
spinning reel in one day- not so with a baitcaster

what we have is, a lot of misinformation/disinformation from reel
companies, who are still selling what is basically an outdated
trolling reel or deep sea reel design, for casting baits- it's simply
not as good a for casting as a spinning reel

a baitcaster DOES have more winching in power- hands down- that is its
only salvation- for catching a large quantity of fish over 10 lbs. in
size, trolling from a boat or deap sea fishing, the choice would be a
baitcaster

a baitcaster does have a vintage romantic charm to it though- and it's
a sturdy thing- I have 4 of them myself, and have using them for about
2 years now. But after a while, it's nice to just put 8 lb. test on
my open face reel, and cast 200 feet effortlessly- and it's deadly
accurate.
 




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