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Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 27th, 2006, 10:04 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe


http://www.peer.org/news/news_id.php?row_id=650
  #2  
Old February 27th, 2006, 10:29 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:04:10 -0600, Barney Fife
wrote:


http://www.peer.org/news/news_id.php?row_id=650


Isn't this the case with most rivers in built up areas in the US?
  #3  
Old February 28th, 2006, 12:15 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

A User wrote:

Barney Fife wrote:


http://www.peer.org/news/news_id.php?row_id=650


Isn't this the case with most rivers in built up areas in the US?


yep. people see a river as a place to toss stuff they no
longer want. cities dump their sewage in rivers. I LOL
at how Chicago dumps their treated sewage in the same lake
they take their drinking water from. I LOL at Raleigh for
allowing homes with open septic drain fields on land around
Falls lake where Raleigh takes their drinking water from.

sad these things are but LOL is better than crying since
neither will change how big money is ruining this planet.
  #4  
Old February 28th, 2006, 01:26 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

Jim Ledford wrote in news:44039637.A15C8C21
@bellsouth.net:

snip

I LOL
at how Chicago dumps their treated sewage in the same lake
they take their drinking water from.


snip

Well, laughingboy, water discharged from a properly designed
and operated waste treatment plant is cleaner than the water
drawn out of many open lakes in the United States. Chicago's
Metropolitan Sanitary District (MSD) is such a waste treatment
operation.

In fact, MSD could bottle it, sell it to you, and you'd never
know. If you want pure virgin water you need to get hydrogen
and oxygen and combine them by burning.


  #5  
Old February 28th, 2006, 01:44 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 20:26:14 -0500, Sheldon Harper
wrote:

Jim Ledford wrote in news:44039637.A15C8C21
:

snip

I LOL
at how Chicago dumps their treated sewage in the same lake
they take their drinking water from.


snip

Well, laughingboy, water discharged from a properly designed
and operated waste treatment plant is cleaner than the water
drawn out of many open lakes in the United States. Chicago's
Metropolitan Sanitary District (MSD) is such a waste treatment
operation.

In fact, MSD could bottle it, sell it to you, and you'd never
know. If you want pure virgin water you need to get hydrogen
and oxygen and combine them by burning.


I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.

Invisible at first because it is in suspension, but given the
opportunity for gravity to work on it, the accumulation is quite
pronounced, and of the appropriate brown color.

As far as dissolved chemicals are concerned, they remained in
solution. I attack both problems with sediment and activated carbon
filters. I know someone who died from cancer...her doctor said it was
most likely from drinking the water ( Steger Illinois, which I think
is/was wellwater until we got a feed from Lake Michigan through a
Chicago Heights distribution station ).

In summary, I would not feed tap water to a stray DOG, without first
filtering it through sediment and activated carbon/charcoal filters to
remove _most_ of the impurities. There remains the *heavy metals*
problem, but those filters are way way expensive. Activated
carbon/charcoal with a pre-filter for sediment provides a Good Return
on Investment (ROI). I have two of them in series, for drinking water
purposes only.

Nobody at this house drinks water from any source that isn't first
filtered with my own equipment.

Lg
Chicago ( far South Side )
  #6  
Old February 28th, 2006, 02:16 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

..

I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall

clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be

disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked

at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best

guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.


LOL. your "best guess"? you just made that up.


  #7  
Old February 28th, 2006, 02:28 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

In article ,
Lawrence Glickman wrote:

I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.


I'm guessing iron. I'd bet money against visible organic matter if the
water actually came out of a municipally-supplied tap.

Without proper collection, storage and testing (all of which are a
genuine pain in the keister), an experiment such as yours tells you one
thing: "there's a brown precipitate in the water."

Our tap water comes from a private well. On occasion, it is brown or
blood-**** colored. At first, I too thought it might be some kind of
fertilizer. We live in a rural area, after all. So, I went online and
found out how to collect tap water for testing.

Collected it, stored it and took it to a commercial testing facility
where (after paying $50 per sample) we found out our worries were
unwarranted. It was just a heavy concentration of iron, common in the
midwest.
  #8  
Old February 28th, 2006, 03:08 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

Lawrence Glickman wrote:

[....]

Jim Ledford wrote:

snip

I LOL
at how Chicago dumps their treated sewage in the same lake
they take their drinking water from.


[....]

I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.

Invisible at first because it is in suspension, but given the
opportunity for gravity to work on it, the accumulation is quite
pronounced, and of the appropriate brown color.

As far as dissolved chemicals are concerned, they remained in
solution. I attack both problems with sediment and activated carbon
filters. I know someone who died from cancer...her doctor said it was
most likely from drinking the water ( Steger Illinois, which I think
is/was wellwater until we got a feed from Lake Michigan through a
Chicago Heights distribution station ).

In summary, I would not feed tap water to a stray DOG, without first
filtering it through sediment and activated carbon/charcoal filters to
remove _most_ of the impurities. There remains the *heavy metals*
problem, but those filters are way way expensive. Activated
carbon/charcoal with a pre-filter for sediment provides a Good Return
on Investment (ROI). I have two of them in series, for drinking water
purposes only.

Nobody at this house drinks water from any source that isn't first
filtered with my own equipment.

Lg
Chicago ( far South Side )


Lg - smart person, good job for your work.
  #9  
Old February 28th, 2006, 03:09 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
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Posts: n/a
Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

bearclaw wrote:

Lawrence Glickman wrote:

I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.


I'm guessing iron. I'd bet money against visible organic matter if the
water actually came out of a municipally-supplied tap.

Without proper collection, storage and testing (all of which are a
genuine pain in the keister), an experiment such as yours tells you one
thing: "there's a brown precipitate in the water."

Our tap water comes from a private well. On occasion, it is brown or
blood-**** colored. At first, I too thought it might be some kind of
fertilizer. We live in a rural area, after all. So, I went online and
found out how to collect tap water for testing.

Collected it, stored it and took it to a commercial testing facility
where (after paying $50 per sample) we found out our worries were
unwarranted. It was just a heavy concentration of iron, common in the
midwest.


just keep telling yourself that. stay happy.
  #10  
Old February 28th, 2006, 04:00 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing,misc.rural,misc.consumers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish Down Stream 3M Ssite On Mississippi River Unsafe

On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 22:08:21 -0500, Jim Ledford
wrote:

Lawrence Glickman wrote:

[....]

Jim Ledford wrote:

snip

I LOL
at how Chicago dumps their treated sewage in the same lake
they take their drinking water from.

[....]

I would know, as I did the experiment.
I took tap water from lake Michigan and filled a tall clear bottle
with it. I then put it in a place where it wouldn't be disturbed for
72 hours. After that time, I took the bottle and looked at the
bottom, where a thick brown sediment had settled. My best guess is
that is human fecal material at the bottom of the bottle.

Invisible at first because it is in suspension, but given the
opportunity for gravity to work on it, the accumulation is quite
pronounced, and of the appropriate brown color.

As far as dissolved chemicals are concerned, they remained in
solution. I attack both problems with sediment and activated carbon
filters. I know someone who died from cancer...her doctor said it was
most likely from drinking the water ( Steger Illinois, which I think
is/was wellwater until we got a feed from Lake Michigan through a
Chicago Heights distribution station ).

In summary, I would not feed tap water to a stray DOG, without first
filtering it through sediment and activated carbon/charcoal filters to
remove _most_ of the impurities. There remains the *heavy metals*
problem, but those filters are way way expensive. Activated
carbon/charcoal with a pre-filter for sediment provides a Good Return
on Investment (ROI). I have two of them in series, for drinking water
purposes only.

Nobody at this house drinks water from any source that isn't first
filtered with my own equipment.

Lg
Chicago ( far South Side )


Lg - smart person, good job for your work.


Thanks Jim,

Here is my response to those that think I was looking at IRON
precipitate.*

THAT'S A HELL OF A LOT OF IRON! We're talking 1/16th deep LAYER of
this *stuff.* If it is human feces, it is _dead_ human feces, but
feces none the less.

I will need a biology microscope to investigate the exact nature of
the material collected as *precipitate,* or it can be removed, dried,
then burned and its' color spectrum analyzed for materials present. I
will never have enough $ for the spectrum analyzer, but I might be
able to borrow a bio microscope. I know human feces is composed 50%
by weight of bacteria. I also know what bacteria look like ( I
studied Invertibrate Zoology in college ).

If the precipitate is organic in origin, I will identify it as such.
These things have cell walls, even if they are bacteria. Iron does
not have cell walls. If there are cell walls present, you can be
assured it is ORGANIC in nature.

(*) denotes *you* plural, not Jim in particular.

There are many many communities that have fecal material in their
water supply. It is dead, but other things in there are no good. For
example, did you know that the chlorine that is added to water to kill
the bacteria often transmutes into chloriform? which is a carcinogen.

And furthermore, there is the fact that Lake Michigan has a deposit
underwater of the Highest concentration of Dioxin known on EARTH, from
a chemical plant that released its' effluent into the Lake for 50
years before it was shut down. EPA doesn't dare touch it, for fear of
putting it into suspension and disbursing into the drinking water
supply ( their philosopy is let sleeping dogs lie ).

And then there are the unknow contents of thousands of barrels of who
knows what that have leached into the soil along southern lake
Michigan from over 1 century of Industrail Steel Production. In fact,
during one hard rain which forced a sewage treatment plant in Hammond,
Indiana to overflow its' containment walls, the neighboring town
brought in earthmoving equipment and put up EARTHEN DIKES between
Hammond and their township ( hegewish ) so that contamination wouldn't
spread into their community.

Again, children are often burned in puddles of who knows what that are
found when it rains and absorbs toxins from the soil here.

Superfund EPA technicians have investigated unmarked and leaking
barrels in my area and have NO IDEA what is in them. They remain to
this day...unidentified. No doubt a witche's brew of all the harmful
things humanity can invent but wants nothing to do with. Left behind
by manufacturing for someone else to clean up.

Lg
 




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