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Another deep cycle battery question...>>>



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 25th, 2004, 06:08 PM
Marty S.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

Hi all...

I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I have a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates, and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

Thanks in advance for any input...

Marty

--
Marty S.
Baltimore, MD USA



  #2  
Old May 25th, 2004, 06:27 PM
Rod McInnis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>


"Marty S." wrote in message
...
Hi all...



Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be

the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?


What gives a battery its current and capacity ratings are the surface area
of the lead plates and the volume of the electrolyte.

You can build a battery with thick, heavy lead plates and make it weigh a
lot more without improving its ratings. Or to put a different spin on it,
you can make a battery that has impressive specifications and make it a lot
cheaper by making the lead plates very thin. The drawback, however, is the
durability of the battery. If you compare a "light" and "heavy" battery, as
the batteries age the battery with thin plates will degrade much faster than
the battery with thick heavy plates.

My experience with "cheap" deep cycle batteries is that you get what you
pay for.

Rod


  #3  
Old May 25th, 2004, 07:08 PM
Wayne.B
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

On Tue, 25 May 2004 13:08:42 -0400, "Marty S."
wrote:
I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I have a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates, and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

=====================================
Group 24 and group 27 describe the size of the battery case, not what
is inside of it. A battery that weighs more will almost always have
more capacity. My choice would be two 6 volt batteries wired in
series. Each battery by itself is a manageable weight and the two
combined will give you far more capacity than any group 24 or 27.
  #4  
Old May 25th, 2004, 08:13 PM
D0N ßâiley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>


"Wayne.B" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 25 May 2004 13:08:42 -0400, "Marty S."
wrote:
I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I have

a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates,

and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me

longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears

there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be

correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be

the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

=====================================
Group 24 and group 27 describe the size of the battery case, not what
is inside of it. A battery that weighs more will almost always have
more capacity. My choice would be two 6 volt batteries wired in
series. Each battery by itself is a manageable weight and the two
combined will give you far more capacity than any group 24 or 27.


I would agree with the 6-volt thing with the following exception:
6-volt batts are heavier than you might think. Picking them up
Im always suprised how heavy they are. ;-)
Also, They last WAYYY longer than most 12 volt batts.


I buy 'em at Sams. Around $45.00

db



  #5  
Old May 25th, 2004, 10:06 PM
Wayne.B
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

On Tue, 25 May 2004 15:13:57 -0400, "D0N ßâiley"
wrote:


"Wayne.B" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 25 May 2004 13:08:42 -0400, "Marty S."
wrote:
I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I have

a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates,

and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me

longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears

there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be

correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be

the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

=====================================
Group 24 and group 27 describe the size of the battery case, not what
is inside of it. A battery that weighs more will almost always have
more capacity. My choice would be two 6 volt batteries wired in
series. Each battery by itself is a manageable weight and the two
combined will give you far more capacity than any group 24 or 27.


I would agree with the 6-volt thing with the following exception:
6-volt batts are heavier than you might think. Picking them up
Im always suprised how heavy they are. ;-)
Also, They last WAYYY longer than most 12 volt batts.


I buy 'em at Sams. Around $45.00

==========================================

They're about 60 pounds, heavy but manageable. Considering that two
will give you more amp-hours of capacity than an 8D, I think that
they are a gerat deal.
  #6  
Old May 26th, 2004, 02:17 AM
Terry Spragg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

Marty S. wrote:
Hi all...

I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I have a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates, and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

Thanks in advance for any input...

Marty


Dumping quality control to the consumer? A little "better" battery
for a more cheaply produced one? Warranty extension? "Write it for
4 years, it'll last 5, if it don't get froze, flat." Don't bother
trimming the edges so much. Ship an extra 2 percent or so, to cover
in store warranty? Let somebody else look after the duds and argue
with customers? Design a zippy lable. Hire a model for a sales
person. Produce a new band video advert. Blackmail the buyers?

It's a war of attrition for the battery guys, go figure. Lead is a
precious metal. Ask the users. What brands?

Fiddlehead pickin' is finished for the season in these parts.

Terry K -Cynical alternatives, food for thought.

  #7  
Old May 26th, 2004, 10:19 AM
Stanley Barthfarkle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

Easy on the drugs, Terry- can't understand a word yer sayin.... it's like
watchin Keith Richards type a sentence.


"Terry Spragg" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Marty S. wrote:
Hi all...

I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I

have a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in

the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight

of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates,

and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me

longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro

Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've

gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears

there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be

correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be

the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

Thanks in advance for any input...

Marty


Dumping quality control to the consumer? A little "better" battery
for a more cheaply produced one? Warranty extension? "Write it for
4 years, it'll last 5, if it don't get froze, flat." Don't bother
trimming the edges so much. Ship an extra 2 percent or so, to cover
in store warranty? Let somebody else look after the duds and argue
with customers? Design a zippy lable. Hire a model for a sales
person. Produce a new band video advert. Blackmail the buyers?

It's a war of attrition for the battery guys, go figure. Lead is a
precious metal. Ask the users. What brands?

Fiddlehead pickin' is finished for the season in these parts.

Terry K -Cynical alternatives, food for thought.



  #8  
Old May 31st, 2004, 11:58 AM
Bill Darden
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Another deep cycle battery question...>>>

For consumer tips on buying deep cycle batteries, please see Section 7
of the Car and Deep Cycle Battery FAQ on www.batteryfaq.org.

Kindest regards,

BiLL.....

"Stanley Barthfarkle" wrote in message ...
Easy on the drugs, Terry- can't understand a word yer sayin.... it's like
watchin Keith Richards type a sentence.


"Terry Spragg" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Marty S. wrote:
Hi all...

I'm shopping around for the right deep cycle battery for my use.. I

have a
12' jon boat with a 65lb electric motor for reservoir fishing here in

the
Baltimore (Maryland) area. I'm looking at the tradeoff between weight

of
the battteries and length of time on the water.

I was under the understanding that the difference between a Group 27 and
Group 24 battery is the number of plates and/or the size of the plates,

and
that all things being equal, that the Group 27 battery would give me

longer
time on the water.

Here's my question -- as I'm shopping for these batteries (Bass Pro

Shop,
Wal-mart, Sears, Auto Zone, Boat/US Marine, etc.) I'm finding that some
Group 24's weigh the same as Group 27s (at Wal-mart and Sears I've

gotten
scales from the housewares department and weighed the batteries in the
store!). At Wal-mart the batteries are the same weight but at Sears

there
is a 8-10 pound difference. The weights also don't appear to be

correlated
to reserve capacity, either.

Why would a Group 24 and Group 27 battery from the same manufacturer be

the
same weight??? And, since they are the same weight, why wouldn't the
reserve capacity be the same?

Thanks in advance for any input...

Marty


Dumping quality control to the consumer? A little "better" battery
for a more cheaply produced one? Warranty extension? "Write it for
4 years, it'll last 5, if it don't get froze, flat." Don't bother
trimming the edges so much. Ship an extra 2 percent or so, to cover
in store warranty? Let somebody else look after the duds and argue
with customers? Design a zippy lable. Hire a model for a sales
person. Produce a new band video advert. Blackmail the buyers?

It's a war of attrition for the battery guys, go figure. Lead is a
precious metal. Ask the users. What brands?

Fiddlehead pickin' is finished for the season in these parts.

Terry K -Cynical alternatives, food for thought.

 




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