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Are riveted jon boats okay?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 27th, 2008, 03:51 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
jmDesktop
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Posts: 3
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.
  #2  
Old March 27th, 2008, 08:50 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
[email protected]
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Posts: 52
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop
wrote:

I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Riveted boats are just fine. Far less expensive than a 100% welded
model - if you can even find one. Most flat-bottom jon boats (never
seen any other kind) are very stable, and ideal for small bodies of
water. NEVER exceed any of the manufacturer's "limits"....# of
people, weight, horsepower, etc. for ANY boat. When shopping for one,
it wouldn't hurt to get "a little more than you need".....a bit
longer, more capacity etc .... unless of course you have to carry or
drag it to your fishing hole.

Leaks? The seam sealants used today are far superior to what they
were ... even 10 years ago, and with proper use, should easily outlast
the owner. Never use any type of solvent to clean the boat as some
solvents may "attack" the sealant. Riveted seams can be more durable
than welded seams in that they will "flex" a little more than a welded
seam, which has to be PERFECT. If a weld is not perfect, it can crack
or even tear with repeated flexings.

Have fun shopping!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"
  #3  
Old March 27th, 2008, 08:58 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
[email protected]
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Posts: 52
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop
wrote:

I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Just one more thing about limits in regards to seaworthiness ... This
factor almost always depends on the operator's own
seamanship/skill/boat-handling ability. I have seen folks in a 24ft
Bayliner that could not handle 2 to 3-foot seas, trying to fish right
alongside someone in a 14 foot aluminum "row-boat" (powered of
course!) that was doing just fine. Again, never exceed your own
limits. Most importantly, KNOW what your limits are!!!!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"
  #4  
Old March 27th, 2008, 12:16 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
jmDesktop
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Posts: 3
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

On Mar 27, 4:50*am, wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop

wrote:
I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. *Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? *I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? *Thank
you.


Riveted boats are just fine. *Far less expensive than a 100% welded
model - if you can even find one. *Most flat-bottom jon boats (never
seen any other kind) *are very stable, and ideal for small bodies of
water. *NEVER exceed any of the manufacturer's "limits"....# of
people, weight, horsepower, etc. for ANY boat. *When shopping for one,
it wouldn't hurt to get "a little more than you need".....a bit
longer, more capacity etc .... unless of course you have to carry or
drag it to your fishing hole.

Leaks? *The seam sealants used today are far superior to what they
were ... even 10 years ago, and with proper use, should easily outlast
the owner. *Never use any type of solvent to clean the boat as some
solvents may "attack" the sealant. *Riveted seams can be more durable
than welded seams in that they will "flex" a little more than a welded
seam, which has to be PERFECT. *If a weld is not perfect, it can crack
or even tear with repeated flexings.

Have fun shopping!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"


Could small children sit in it and fish, like about five years old?
You don't have to be super still like a canoe do you? Thanks.
  #5  
Old March 27th, 2008, 05:06 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
John B
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Posts: 243
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?


I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only way
flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small lake
fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank you.

========

I have had many riveted boats over the years, and never had any problems
with leaks. I had a 12' jon boat that I hauled around on top of my
truck. It was a great little boat for small waters.

It was stable enough, but I wouldn't advise using them in really windy
conditions. And if you are going to have small children in a jon boat, I
would make sure they understand the "rules", and always wear the best
suited life preserver for small children...check Coast Guard regulations
and recommendations for child water safety devices.

Have fun

John B

  #6  
Old March 27th, 2008, 09:58 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Guy Anderson, Sr.
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Posts: 29
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop
wrote:

I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Jon boats are definitely less tipsy than canoes.......

The stability depends in large part on the size of the jon boat. In
general, the larger the more stable. The most popular sizes are 12
and 14 feet. The bottom width is perhaps the most important
dimension--again, the wider the the more stable. I sometimes use a 14
footer with 36" bottom and 54" beam (width across the sides). It is
plenty stable for seated fishing, but you risk taking a dunk if you
stand.
  #7  
Old March 27th, 2008, 11:29 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Da Chief
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Posts: 33
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

I started out in a riveted jon boat. It now belongs to my son who uses
regularly. If you remain seated you'll never have a problem. If you and a
passenger move to the same side at the same time, then you risk being
swamped and when a metal jon boat takes on water it sinks like, well like a
big chunk of metal. Nuff said.

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Property Systems Real Estate
Foreclosure Specialist; General Sales and Listings
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"jmDesktop" wrote in message
...
On Mar 27, 4:50 am, wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop

wrote:
I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Riveted boats are just fine. Far less expensive than a 100% welded
model - if you can even find one. Most flat-bottom jon boats (never
seen any other kind) are very stable, and ideal for small bodies of
water. NEVER exceed any of the manufacturer's "limits"....# of
people, weight, horsepower, etc. for ANY boat. When shopping for one,
it wouldn't hurt to get "a little more than you need".....a bit
longer, more capacity etc .... unless of course you have to carry or
drag it to your fishing hole.

Leaks? The seam sealants used today are far superior to what they
were ... even 10 years ago, and with proper use, should easily outlast
the owner. Never use any type of solvent to clean the boat as some
solvents may "attack" the sealant. Riveted seams can be more durable
than welded seams in that they will "flex" a little more than a welded
seam, which has to be PERFECT. If a weld is not perfect, it can crack
or even tear with repeated flexings.

Have fun shopping!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"


Could small children sit in it and fish, like about five years old?
You don't have to be super still like a canoe do you? Thanks.


  #8  
Old March 28th, 2008, 01:16 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Calif Bill
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Posts: 531
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?


"jmDesktop" wrote in message
...
On Mar 27, 4:50 am, wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop

wrote:
I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Riveted boats are just fine. Far less expensive than a 100% welded
model - if you can even find one. Most flat-bottom jon boats (never
seen any other kind) are very stable, and ideal for small bodies of
water. NEVER exceed any of the manufacturer's "limits"....# of
people, weight, horsepower, etc. for ANY boat. When shopping for one,
it wouldn't hurt to get "a little more than you need".....a bit
longer, more capacity etc .... unless of course you have to carry or
drag it to your fishing hole.

Leaks? The seam sealants used today are far superior to what they
were ... even 10 years ago, and with proper use, should easily outlast
the owner. Never use any type of solvent to clean the boat as some
solvents may "attack" the sealant. Riveted seams can be more durable
than welded seams in that they will "flex" a little more than a welded
seam, which has to be PERFECT. If a weld is not perfect, it can crack
or even tear with repeated flexings.

Have fun shopping!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"


Could small children sit in it and fish, like about five years old?
You don't have to be super still like a canoe do you? Thanks.

You want at least a 14' boat. The 12' boats are very common, but do not
carry as much weight and are not as seaworthy. My 14' Valco was about 12#
more than the 12' model, but had about 170# extra cargo capacity. I had
rivets leak. You can reset the rivets or replace them, and can even cover
the bottom with Gluvit if lots are leaking.


  #9  
Old March 28th, 2008, 05:13 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
Bob La Londe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,009
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

"jmDesktop" wrote in message
...
I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? Thank
you.


Jon boat is a pretty generic term. I've got a 16 footer I stand up and bass
fish out of all day long. Bigger is better for stability. Mine's pretty
darn wide, but its also rated for 50HP, so its probably not really what you
are asking about.

An jon should be more stable than most canoes. If you already have a canoe
though you might consider a canoe stabilizer. Basically a set of floats off
to each side of the canoe rigidly mounted to it.



  #10  
Old March 28th, 2008, 07:13 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.bass
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default Are riveted jon boats okay?

On Thu, 27 Mar 2008 05:16:36 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop
wrote:

On Mar 27, 4:50*am, wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 20:51:37 -0700 (PDT), jmDesktop

wrote:
I knew a guy that said his leaked at the rivets. *Is that they only
way flat bottom boats are made, "riveted"? *I just want one for small
lake fishing, What are the limits of one, do they tip easily? *Thank
you.


Riveted boats are just fine. *Far less expensive than a 100% welded
model - if you can even find one. *Most flat-bottom jon boats (never
seen any other kind) *are very stable, and ideal for small bodies of
water. *NEVER exceed any of the manufacturer's "limits"....# of
people, weight, horsepower, etc. for ANY boat. *When shopping for one,
it wouldn't hurt to get "a little more than you need".....a bit
longer, more capacity etc .... unless of course you have to carry or
drag it to your fishing hole.

Leaks? *The seam sealants used today are far superior to what they
were ... even 10 years ago, and with proper use, should easily outlast
the owner. *Never use any type of solvent to clean the boat as some
solvents may "attack" the sealant. *Riveted seams can be more durable
than welded seams in that they will "flex" a little more than a welded
seam, which has to be PERFECT. *If a weld is not perfect, it can crack
or even tear with repeated flexings.

Have fun shopping!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"


Could small children sit in it and fish, like about five years old?
You don't have to be super still like a canoe do you? Thanks.


Jim, as the others have stated, they are far more stable than a canoe.
They are pretty much ideal for young "fisher-folk" in that you are
pretty close to the water, and what kid isn't enthralled with the
water? If the waters that you plan on fishing in are cold, some type
of floor matting is suggested to keep your feet from getting cold - I
used to fish in Lake Huron in the spring (14ft aluminum boat),
literally pushing small ice floes away from the boat, and my feet were
constantly cold on that bare metal bottom. As "John B" stated, you
have to make SURE that the kids KNOW THE RULES. And, since they
sometimes forget, and may lean too far to the side, one of your
responsibilities as Captain is to use your superior weight and sense
of balance to keep the vessel on an even keel.

I have to disagree with "Da Chief" on the sinking part - most of
today's boats have foam-filled bench seats that will keep the boat
afloat, (not necessarily totally above water, but off of the bottom of
the lake anyway) even if you manage to swamp it.....provided of course
that you don't have it loaded with a BUNCH of gear. Even if the seats
are not foam-filled, you can have them filled by almost any company
that installs spray-in expanding foam insulation. Here is a link to a
14ft Tracker that is offered by Bass Pro -
http://www.trackerboats.com/boat/gallery.cfm?boat=2863 (trailer shown
is not included, but an option)

BTW ..... A hearty Thank You for introducing a Kid to fishing!!!
--
Calling an Illegal Alien an "Undocumented Worker" is like calling a
Crack Dealer an "Unlicensed Pharmacist"
 




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