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Fly Fishing Rods



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 2nd, 2008, 06:09 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
W. D. Grey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 391
Default Fly Fishing Rods

In article , Charles Turner
writes
Hi Guys,

I go fly fishing here in the UK a few times a year, but I might now go
a bit more frequently, mainly reservoir / river. I'm thinking of
getting some new tackle and am just looking for a bit of advice.

I have a really old glass fibre rod (20 years??). It's a Shakespeare
Sigma Supra 1725 - 285. 9.5 ft AFTMA No. 8-9. I also have a multi turn
fly reel.


The spec for the rod seems to be fine for UK reservoir fishing, but I
would recommend a new rod made of modern materials. Fibre glass is sooo
yesterday :-) A rod with s fast top action is what you need.

Am I right in thinking that virtually no-one uses the drag on a reel to
play the fish? I've certainly never seen anyone doing it, so is there
any point in paying 200+ for a reel?


On still waters or reservoirs, usually the fish are played by hand
lining in the line. I can't say if this is the best way, but it is the
most common way.

So I'm guessing that the real value lies in the rod / line combination.
Now from experience of other sports (tennis / squash etc) that use
carbon fibre equipment I've always found that there is quite a big
difference between the lowest price and around the 60% of top price,
but very little difference in the top 30-40% of the upper price range.
Is this the case for rods? I.e I can imagine a big difference between a
59 rod and a 250 rod, but what about between the 250 rod and a 500 rod?


You will be able to buy a rod that will cast a good line for less than
100, especially if you match it up to a WF 8 or 9 line. Floating is my
first suggestion and I prefer Cortland 444 but things surely must have
moved on since I last bought a line.

--
Bill Grey

  #2  
Old September 13th, 2008, 02:21 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
Derek Moody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 285
Default Fly Fishing Rods

In article , W. D. Grey
wrote:
In article , Charles Turner
writes
Hi Guys,

I go fly fishing here in the UK a few times a year, but I might now go
a bit more frequently, mainly reservoir / river. I'm thinking of
getting some new tackle and am just looking for a bit of advice.

I have a really old glass fibre rod (20 years??). It's a Shakespeare
Sigma Supra 1725 - 285. 9.5 ft AFTMA No. 8-9. I also have a multi turn
fly reel.


The spec for the rod seems to be fine for UK reservoir fishing, but I
would recommend a new rod made of modern materials. Fibre glass is sooo
yesterday :-) A rod with s fast top action is what you need.


Maybe Bill, but he might find the slow action more suitable if he's no need
of long casts or wanting to fish awkward/encumbered banks.

Am I right in thinking that virtually no-one uses the drag on a reel to
play the fish? I've certainly never seen anyone doing it, so is there


What size are the largest fish you expect in your preferred waters? If a
6oz brownie then no drag required, if 15lb+ then it probably is.

any point in paying 200+ for a reel?


I never have.

On still waters or reservoirs, usually the fish are played by hand
lining in the line. I can't say if this is the best way, but it is the
most common way.


I usually reckon that once you are playing on the backing the reel ought to
be used - but that's just imo.

So I'm guessing that the real value lies in the rod / line combination.
Now from experience of other sports (tennis / squash etc) that use
carbon fibre equipment I've always found that there is quite a big
difference between the lowest price and around the 60% of top price,
but very little difference in the top 30-40% of the upper price range.
Is this the case for rods? I.e I can imagine a big difference between a
59 rod and a 250 rod, but what about between the 250 rod and a 500 rod?


Apart from the extremes - under 20, over 500, there is very little
difference in the blanks and many of the budget rods are made on the same
blanks as the upmarket ones with different furniture and finish. Ask to
handle a few of last years models ('out of date' and so cheap) - pick the
cheapest one that feels OK.

You will be able to buy a rod that will cast a good line for less than
100, especially if you match it up to a WF 8 or 9 line. Floating is my
first suggestion and I prefer Cortland 444 but things surely must have
moved on since I last bought a line.


You should be able to get a complete outfit for under 100 - use what you
save on a refresher casting lesson and a couple of fishing trips. :-)

Cheerio,

--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/

  #3  
Old September 13th, 2008, 03:57 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,901
Default Fly Fishing Rods

On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 14:21:36 +0100, Derek Moody
wrote:

In article , W. D. Grey
wrote:
In article , Charles Turner
writes
Hi Guys,

I go fly fishing here in the UK a few times a year, but I might now go
a bit more frequently, mainly reservoir / river. I'm thinking of
getting some new tackle and am just looking for a bit of advice.

I have a really old glass fibre rod (20 years??). It's a Shakespeare
Sigma Supra 1725 - 285. 9.5 ft AFTMA No. 8-9. I also have a multi turn
fly reel.


The spec for the rod seems to be fine for UK reservoir fishing, but I
would recommend a new rod made of modern materials. Fibre glass is sooo
yesterday :-) A rod with s fast top action is what you need.


Maybe Bill, but he might find the slow action more suitable if he's no need
of long casts or wanting to fish awkward/encumbered banks.

Am I right in thinking that virtually no-one uses the drag on a reel to
play the fish? I've certainly never seen anyone doing it, so is there


What size are the largest fish you expect in your preferred waters? If a
6oz brownie then no drag required, if 15lb+ then it probably is.

any point in paying 200+ for a reel?


I never have.

On still waters or reservoirs, usually the fish are played by hand
lining in the line. I can't say if this is the best way, but it is the
most common way.


I usually reckon that once you are playing on the backing the reel ought to
be used - but that's just imo.

So I'm guessing that the real value lies in the rod / line combination.
Now from experience of other sports (tennis / squash etc) that use
carbon fibre equipment I've always found that there is quite a big
difference between the lowest price and around the 60% of top price,
but very little difference in the top 30-40% of the upper price range.
Is this the case for rods? I.e I can imagine a big difference between a
59 rod and a 250 rod, but what about between the 250 rod and a 500 rod?


Apart from the extremes - under 20, over 500, there is very little
difference in the blanks and many of the budget rods are made on the same
blanks as the upmarket ones with different furniture and finish. Ask to
handle a few of last years models ('out of date' and so cheap) - pick the
cheapest one that feels OK.

You will be able to buy a rod that will cast a good line for less than
100, especially if you match it up to a WF 8 or 9 line. Floating is my
first suggestion and I prefer Cortland 444 but things surely must have
moved on since I last bought a line.


You should be able to get a complete outfit for under 100 - use what you
save on a refresher casting lesson and a couple of fishing trips. :-)


Absolutely. In fact, I saw a couple of used setups - rod and reel, no
line to speak of, one a Daiwa and the other a Shakespeare, both usable
fishing tools in graphite, offered for 20USD (about 50p UK
nowadays...oh, OK, if it's necessary: G). Either of which would make
decent gear for a beginner/novice and still-usable for anyone. I even
thought about dickering a bit, just to have them around for guests, but
don't really need them, so I left them for someone who might be able to
really enjoy them. IAC, these types of things seem to turn up
regularly, at least IME, so the OP might do a little digging around
locally so as to see what might turn up. If the OP is fishing for
smaller quarry, just about anything with a reel seat and basically
straight guides will work and a reel is merely a line holder - anything
above that is desire rather than necessity on such quarry.

TC,
R

Cheerio,


  #5  
Old September 14th, 2008, 06:15 AM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,901
Default Fly Fishing Rods

On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 23:45:49 +0100, "W. D. Grey"
wrote:

In article ,
writes
Absolutely. In fact, I saw a couple of used setups - rod and reel, no
line to speak of, one a Daiwa and the other a Shakespeare, both usable
fishing tools in graphite, offered for 20USD (about 50p UK


Fishing last Wednesday I tried out a rod/line combo for a pal.. I didn't
think to find out the name of the rod but he assured me it cost
40ukpounds and the line - a WEF 8 cost 10 ukPounds. I easily managed to
cast the whole line off the reel. The line just wanted to go - fantastic
value. It was a well matched outfit which was the important thing.


Money is what we choose to spend...obviously, one doesn't _need_ to
spend to fish, and speaking for myself, I'd rather have fun with an
inexpensive rig than fret over a pricy rig...as always, YMMV...but I
suspect your energy expenditure is somewhat similar to mine...OTOH, what
the **** do I know...have you gots you a Jag with a passel of Webers...?

TC,
R
  #8  
Old September 15th, 2008, 12:11 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
W. D. Grey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 391
Default Fly Fishing Rods

In article , Dave Lane
writes
W. D. Grey wrote:
In article ,
writes
On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 23:45:49 +0100, "W. D. Grey"
wrote:

In article ,
writes
Absolutely. In fact, I saw a couple of used setups - rod and reel, no
line to speak of, one a Daiwa and the other a Shakespeare, both usable
fishing tools in graphite, offered for 20USD (about 50p UK

Fishing last Wednesday I tried out a rod/line combo for a pal.. I didn't
think to find out the name of the rod but he assured me it cost
40ukpounds and the line - a WEF 8 cost 10 ukPounds. I easily managed to
cast the whole line off the reel. The line just wanted to go - fantastic
value. It was a well matched outfit which was the important thing.

Money is what we choose to spend...obviously, one doesn't _need_ to
spend to fish, and speaking for myself, I'd rather have fun with an
inexpensive rig than fret over a pricy rig...as always, YMMV...but I
suspect your energy expenditure is somewhat similar to mine...OTOH, what
the **** do I know...have you gots you a Jag with a passel of Webers...?

Just a Ford.... KA :-)
Difficult to get a decent rod in the back though!


you want to try getting a 14 foot double hander into a mini???
Even in 3 pieces.... :+)


Your maths are in terrible state - 3 doesn't go into 14...:-)

How are things Dave - any salmon this season yet?
--
Bill Grey

  #9  
Old September 15th, 2008, 09:41 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
Derek Moody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 285
Default Fly Fishing Rods

In article , Dave Lane
URL:mailto
you want to try getting a 14 foot double hander into a mini???
Even in 3 pieces.... :+)


I haven't had a chance to try getting my 14 foot double hander into anything
yet this year - getting a bit late now 'though I might take it piking before
the weather goes cold.

Just spent a couple of weeks in Ireland, far -too much- water though. There
were a couple of Shannon tribs we could have fished but even finding the
river under all that floodwater would have been a feat. Not knowing the
water the conditions would have been too dangerous. Even the sea fishing
was badly affected by the mile or so of dirty brown runoff surrounding the
coast.

Cheerio,

--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/

  #10  
Old September 15th, 2008, 11:20 PM posted to rec.outdoors.fishing.fly,uk.rec.fishing.game
Lazarus Cooke
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Fly Fishing Rods

In article , Derek Moody
wrote:


Just spent a couple of weeks in Ireland, far -too much- water though. There
were a couple of Shannon tribs we could have fished but even finding the
river under all that floodwater would have been a feat.


Hi Derek whereabouts were you? I've been thinking it would have been a
great season on the Irish rivers I usually fish on the Foyle system -
it's rare for Irish rivers to have more water than they can handel.

Lazarus
 




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