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The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 29th, 2010, 09:17 PM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Sandy Birrell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

18-20th June

(pictures here
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/...inverlael.html )

It was three years in the planning before we eventually got everything
together and headed for Inverlael and Lochan a` Chnapaich. I picked up
Fred, the Hare, and Suzy, the Hound, in the car park at Carrbridge in
warm sunny weather. The temperature had varied from 21șC to 19șC on
the drive up and I wasn't looking forward to walking in the heat. By
the time we reached the car park at Inverlael the sun was still
shining but the temperature was down to 14șC and felt colder in the
Northerly airstream that was blowing down the glen.

Getting boots on and preparing for the walk takes time so the Hare
thought he would get the Hound to eat one of her meals to save
carrying it up the hill. She wasn't having any of that but was
prepared to hoover up the crumbs and fallen lettuce from his roll, he
ended up having to carry it after all.

The first part of the walk is through forestry, now partly cleared but
replanted, on an unmetalled hard packed forestry road making the going
easy, but I find hard on the feet. This two-mile section was to set
the trend for the rest of the walk. The Hound, oldest at 63 (9x7 human
years) although I think that should be halved as she has four legs,
roaming in front nosing into everything and anything she could find.
Next the Hare, typical Munro bagger, Alpinist, hill walker style with
hands stuck in the trouser pockets, head down and staccato steps
eating up the miles, at nearing 58 the youngest of the party. The rear
was taken by the Tortoise, nearer 60 than 59, with measured steps
pacing himself for the anticipated climb still to come. Half an hour
to this point was acceptable; it was all downhill, sorry, uphill after
that.

The great bulk of the mountain we were heading for took up the view on
the horizon with the path winding its way ever higher in the
foreground.

The climb from here on was on a well-made stalkers path, eroded
slightly in places but still in good order, you can tell that when it
is the only thing you see for three miles. That isn't strictly true I
had enough rest stops to look around at the view and the back of the
Hound and Hare far above me. They did stop and let me catch up a few
times though so that was considerate of them.

Three and a half hours, and a touch over three miles later, we
eventually reached the loch. I didn't even have the pleasure of
collapsing in a heap at this point as the tent had to be put up and
dinner made. The extra long sleeve t-shirt had to be put on and the
lightweight fleece on top of that too as it was freezing in the strong
north wind that was blowing right into the corrie.

The Hare decided on a reconnaissance of the area and the Hound
accompanied him, the Tortoise mucked about the camp then, when they
returned, decided that it would be warmer in the tent than standing
about in the freezing wind outside.

Next day the temperature hadn't got any warmer and the wind was
stronger if anything. I had woken during the night and my nose and
cheeks, all that was exposed to the air, were freezing so it must have
been a cold night.

We had breakfast, then, without too much hope of success in the
strong, cold, gusty wind, we started fishing round the loch. The air
temperature at this point was 12șC and the water the same. The water
was crystal clear and I could see the bottom clearly with the
polaroids. There were patches of small boulders with areas of mud and
short grass like weedy areas that shone brilliant green in the strong
sunshine. There were also deep black areas that could have been deep
holes or just barren rocky or muddy areas. There were only a few
patches of longer weeds that looked like last years growth with no new
growth discernable amongst the fronds. There wasn't a lot of fly life
about although the grass and heather seemed to be full of Cinnamon
Sedge and Stone Fly and every time you picked up the rucksack there
would be half a dozen clinging to it, I even found them inside the
gaiters and boots in the morning as I was putting them on. There was
the odd upwing fly that I didn't get a chance to identify but were
possibly Claret or Sepia Duns. At the edge of the water I saw shrimp,
snails and brown speckled tadpoles, possibly Toad.

Casting was a nightmare as the wind would go from a gentle breeze to a
full on gale even as you were casting. Being a corrie loch it also had
the tendency to change direction without warning in your face one
minute, left or right the next then gusting in from the rear as the
cast whistled by. I gave it my best and fished the whole loch, a bit
more in the afternoon when the wind calmed down and so did the loch,
but it wasn't to be, and I never saw nor touched a fish.

In between fishing we also managed to wander about the area. It is an
amazing place with great mounds of boulders covered with short dry
grass and stunted heather, real Alpine type terrain. In between, if
you looked closely, were the alpine plants, small cushions with the
most delicate of flowers barely above ground level. Difficult to see
at first but once found you seemed to come across them at every turn.

There were also large and small depressions where the rock was black
and bare of any lichens as if it is under water for long periods while
it slowly drains through the rocks to appear farther down the mountain
exploding as a full-grown river.

It was an early night again on the Saturday as the temperature had
dropped to 6șC by 8:00 pm although the wind had dropped and it didn't
feel quite as cold as it had the night before, either that or we were
just getting used to it.

Next morning, our last, the cloud was right down and visibility was
only thirty yards or so. We had breakfast and packed the tents and
sleeping bags into the rucksacks. The loch was flat calm but, what you
could see of it, was untouched by neither rising flies nor fish. We
shouldered our packs and after a check of the area we walked back down
the path to the car. Two hours and twenty minutes for the five and a
half or so miles; downhill is certainly easier than up.

If you are a walker it is worth the walk, even if you don't fish the
loch. Leave the path in the corrie and wander about the terrain and,
if it is June, look out for the flowers. We didn't lay Fred's ghost to
rest, he was sure he had seen rising fish there many years ago, but
the experience of the area and the alpine plants made up for the lack
of fish.

©2010 Alexander Birrell


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/

  #2  
Old June 29th, 2010, 09:55 PM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Bill Grey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 151
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

18-20th June

(pictures here
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/...inverlael.html )
Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--


Thanks for yet another gripping trip report and pictures. Well done.

Bill


E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/



  #3  
Old June 29th, 2010, 10:28 PM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Sandy Birrell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

Bill Grey wrote:
"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

18-20th June

(pictures here
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/...inverlael.html
) Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--


Thanks for yet another gripping trip report and pictures. Well
done.
Bill


E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/



I'm glad you enjoyed it Bill.


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/

  #4  
Old July 4th, 2010, 06:43 AM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Gordon MacPherson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

18-20th June

(pictures here
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/...inverlael.html )

It was three years in the planning before we eventually got everything
together and headed for Inverlael and Lochan a` Chnapaich. I picked up
Fred, the Hare, and Suzy, the Hound, in the car park at Carrbridge in warm
sunny weather. The temperature had varied from 21șC to 19șC on the drive
up and I wasn't looking forward to walking in the heat. By the time we
reached the car park at Inverlael the sun was still shining but the
temperature was down to 14șC and felt colder in the Northerly airstream
that was blowing down the glen.

Getting boots on and preparing for the walk takes time so the Hare thought
he would get the Hound to eat one of her meals to save carrying it up the
hill. She wasn't having any of that but was prepared to hoover up the
crumbs and fallen lettuce from his roll, he ended up having to carry it
after all.

The first part of the walk is through forestry, now partly cleared but
replanted, on an unmetalled hard packed forestry road making the going
easy, but I find hard on the feet. This two-mile section was to set the
trend for the rest of the walk. The Hound, oldest at 63 (9x7 human years)
although I think that should be halved as she has four legs, roaming in
front nosing into everything and anything she could find. Next the Hare,
typical Munro bagger, Alpinist, hill walker style with hands stuck in the
trouser pockets, head down and staccato steps eating up the miles, at
nearing 58 the youngest of the party. The rear was taken by the Tortoise,
nearer 60 than 59, with measured steps pacing himself for the anticipated
climb still to come. Half an hour to this point was acceptable; it was all
downhill, sorry, uphill after that.

The great bulk of the mountain we were heading for took up the view on the
horizon with the path winding its way ever higher in the foreground.

The climb from here on was on a well-made stalkers path, eroded slightly
in places but still in good order, you can tell that when it is the only
thing you see for three miles. That isn't strictly true I had enough rest
stops to look around at the view and the back of the Hound and Hare far
above me. They did stop and let me catch up a few times though so that was
considerate of them.

Three and a half hours, and a touch over three miles later, we eventually
reached the loch. I didn't even have the pleasure of collapsing in a heap
at this point as the tent had to be put up and dinner made. The extra long
sleeve t-shirt had to be put on and the lightweight fleece on top of that
too as it was freezing in the strong north wind that was blowing right
into the corrie.

The Hare decided on a reconnaissance of the area and the Hound accompanied
him, the Tortoise mucked about the camp then, when they returned, decided
that it would be warmer in the tent than standing about in the freezing
wind outside.

Next day the temperature hadn't got any warmer and the wind was stronger
if anything. I had woken during the night and my nose and cheeks, all that
was exposed to the air, were freezing so it must have been a cold night.

We had breakfast, then, without too much hope of success in the strong,
cold, gusty wind, we started fishing round the loch. The air temperature
at this point was 12șC and the water the same. The water was crystal clear
and I could see the bottom clearly with the polaroids. There were patches
of small boulders with areas of mud and short grass like weedy areas that
shone brilliant green in the strong sunshine. There were also deep black
areas that could have been deep holes or just barren rocky or muddy areas.
There were only a few patches of longer weeds that looked like last years
growth with no new growth discernable amongst the fronds. There wasn't a
lot of fly life about although the grass and heather seemed to be full of
Cinnamon Sedge and Stone Fly and every time you picked up the rucksack
there would be half a dozen clinging to it, I even found them inside the
gaiters and boots in the morning as I was putting them on. There was the
odd upwing fly that I didn't get a chance to identify but were possibly
Claret or Sepia Duns. At the edge of the water I saw shrimp, snails and
brown speckled tadpoles, possibly Toad.

Casting was a nightmare as the wind would go from a gentle breeze to a
full on gale even as you were casting. Being a corrie loch it also had the
tendency to change direction without warning in your face one minute, left
or right the next then gusting in from the rear as the cast whistled by. I
gave it my best and fished the whole loch, a bit more in the afternoon
when the wind calmed down and so did the loch, but it wasn't to be, and I
never saw nor touched a fish.

In between fishing we also managed to wander about the area. It is an
amazing place with great mounds of boulders covered with short dry grass
and stunted heather, real Alpine type terrain. In between, if you looked
closely, were the alpine plants, small cushions with the most delicate of
flowers barely above ground level. Difficult to see at first but once
found you seemed to come across them at every turn.

There were also large and small depressions where the rock was black and
bare of any lichens as if it is under water for long periods while it
slowly drains through the rocks to appear farther down the mountain
exploding as a full-grown river.

It was an early night again on the Saturday as the temperature had dropped
to 6șC by 8:00 pm although the wind had dropped and it didn't feel quite
as cold as it had the night before, either that or we were just getting
used to it.

Next morning, our last, the cloud was right down and visibility was only
thirty yards or so. We had breakfast and packed the tents and sleeping
bags into the rucksacks. The loch was flat calm but, what you could see of
it, was untouched by neither rising flies nor fish. We shouldered our
packs and after a check of the area we walked back down the path to the
car. Two hours and twenty minutes for the five and a half or so miles;
downhill is certainly easier than up.

If you are a walker it is worth the walk, even if you don't fish the loch.
Leave the path in the corrie and wander about the terrain and, if it is
June, look out for the flowers. We didn't lay Fred's ghost to rest, he was
sure he had seen rising fish there many years ago, but the experience of
the area and the alpine plants made up for the lack of fish.

©2010 Alexander Birrell


--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/


Are there any fish in the loch - so high - acid rain?

Gordon


  #5  
Old July 4th, 2010, 09:25 PM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Sandy Birrell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

Gordon MacPherson wrote:
"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


Are there any fish in the loch - so high - acid rain?

Gordon


Many years ago my companion saw fish rising in the loch as he was
climbing the Munroes, he vowed to come back with a fly rod and fish
it. We did and caught nothing. Our thoughts are that it was probably
char he saw and they are notoriously difficult to catch in these high,
deep corrie lochs. As to height, I know of fish caught in Scotland in
higher lochs than 2300 feet which is the height of this one.

--


Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:-
http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/

  #6  
Old July 5th, 2010, 09:23 AM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Just Dave
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise




Hi Sandy,

thanks for posting that. Ohhh, how I know what you mean about the
wind in such places being a pain. I often get up to llyn Idwal, and
the wind thre can do just what you describe, turning 180 mid-cast.
This loch looks very similar to another lake near here, Fynnon lloer,
lying in a cwm above Llyn Ogwen - bit of a steep climb to get up
there, but well worth it.


cheers

Dave



On Jul 4, 9:25*pm, "Sandy Birrell" wrote:
Gordon MacPherson wrote:
"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


Are there any fish in the loch - so high - acid rain?


Gordon


Many years ago my companion saw fish rising in the loch as he was
climbing the Munroes, he vowed to come back with a fly rod and fish
it. We did and caught nothing. Our thoughts are that it was probably
char he saw and they are notoriously difficult to catch in these high,
deep corrie lochs. As to height, I know of fish caught in Scotland in
higher lochs than 2300 feet which is the height of this one.

--

Don`t Worry, Be Happy

* * * Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
* * * Website:- *http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
* *Looking for a webhost? Try *http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild *at *http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/


  #7  
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:34 AM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Derek Moody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 285
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise

In article ,
Just Dave URL:mailto
thanks for posting that.


AOL. Always good to hear how others do it - my (on topic for this group)
fishing rarely requires more than a gently amble but I do make some fairly
rugged trecks along the coast at times when off topic (Did you ever take
your two hander to the swillies Dave?)

Ohhh, how I know what you mean about the
wind in such places being a pain. I often get up to llyn Idwal, and
the wind thre can do just what you describe, turning 180 mid-cast.


It can be a problem under the cliffs too. I've learned to cast, to some
extent, with either hand; switching hands mid-cast is not the answer.
In salt water I can often get away with using a short length of very heavy
line as a SH - would this help on the upland loughs? When it's that tough
it's usually choppy enough to disguise a splashy delivery.

Cheerio,

--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/

  #8  
Old July 6th, 2010, 09:03 AM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Just Dave
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise




Hi Derek...


the DH at the sea-side? Yes, I did give it a go last year, but
didn't really get to grips with casting the brute... much better for
roll casting on the river! As for that wind business..... up at
Idwal, it can be breezy, with the wind direction changing continually
- but the water with only a light ripple. I did find that a good line
like an arrowhead helped to some extent - but sometimes one would try
and punch the line forwards, only to see it apparently hit a glass
wall, and roll out - vertically! Cue heap of tangle at one's feet.
Even better are the mini tornadoes that occasionally form and march
around the lake side (no idea why they do that) - being hit by one is
a bit like being thrown through the car wash - and the resulting mess
of line seriously can ruin one's day.

btw - didn't get to Ireland the other week - we had to postpone it -
so will be off for a longer trip at the start of August, no idea where
yet.

cheers all,

Dave



On Jul 5, 11:34*am, Derek Moody wrote:
In article ,

Just Dave URL:mailto
*thanks for posting that.


AOL. *Always good to hear how others do it - my (on topic for this group)
fishing rarely requires more than a gently amble but I do make some fairly
rugged trecks along the coast at times when off topic (Did you ever take
your two hander to the swillies Dave?)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *Ohhh, how I know what you mean about the
wind in such places being a pain. *I often get up to llyn Idwal, and
the wind thre can do just what you describe, turning 180 mid-cast.


It can be a problem under the cliffs too. *I've learned to cast, to some
extent, with either hand; switching hands mid-cast is not the answer.
In salt water I can often get away with using a short length of very heavy
line as a SH - would this help on the upland loughs? *When it's that tough
it's usually choppy enough to disguise a splashy delivery.

Cheerio,

--
* Fishing: *http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
* Writing: *http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
* uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
* * * * * *http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/


  #9  
Old July 11th, 2010, 06:01 PM posted to uk.rec.fishing.game
Bill Grey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 151
Default The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


"Just Dave" wrote in message
...



Hi Sandy,

thanks for posting that. Ohhh, how I know what you mean about the
wind in such places being a pain. I often get up to llyn Idwal, and
the wind thre can do just what you describe, turning 180 mid-cast.
This loch looks very similar to another lake near here, Fynnon lloer,
lying in a cwm above Llyn Ogwen - bit of a steep climb to get up
there, but well worth it.


cheers

Dave


Huh!

Bill...:-)



On Jul 4, 9:25 pm, "Sandy Birrell" wrote:
Gordon MacPherson wrote:
"Sandy Birrell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The Hare, the Hound and the Tortoise


Are there any fish in the loch - so high - acid rain?


Gordon


Many years ago my companion saw fish rising in the loch as he was
climbing the Munroes, he vowed to come back with a fly rod and fish
it. We did and caught nothing. Our thoughts are that it was probably
char he saw and they are notoriously difficult to catch in these high,
deep corrie lochs. As to height, I know of fish caught in Scotland in
higher lochs than 2300 feet which is the height of this one.

--

Don`t Worry, Be Happy

Sandy
--

E-Mail:-
Website:- http://www.ftscotland.co.uk
Looking for a webhost? Try http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=2966019
Fishing Wild at http://www.wild-fishing-scotland.co.uk/



  #10  
Old May 27th, 2011, 12:41 AM
nelssoncraigg nelssoncraigg is offline
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by FishingBanter: May 2011
Posts: 5
Default

Fishing endure Wednesday I approved out a rod/line admixture for a pal.. I didn't anticipate to acquisition out the name of the rod but he assured me it amount 40ukpounds and the band - a WEF 8 amount 10 ukPounds. I calmly managed to casting the accomplished band off the reel.
 




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