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Fish much smarter than we imagined



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 6th, 2003, 09:41 PM
John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

=46ish much smarter than we imagined=20
=20
LUCY BANNERMAN October 02 2003=20
=20
=20
Copyright =A9 2003 Newsquest (Herald & Times) Limited. All Rights
Reserved =20
=20
=46IRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
=46IRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.
"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.








"Man is the most dangerous, destructive, selfish,=20
and unethical animal on earth."=20
Michael W. Fox, Scientific Director and former=20
Vice President,=20
Humane Society of the United States.

"The life of an ant and that of my child=20
should be granted equal consideration,=20
for what does it really pain man to do so"
Pete Who. 2003=20

"Look deep into the eyes of any animal, and then=20
for a moment, trade places,=20
their life becomes as precious as yours and you=20
become as vulnerable as them.=20
Now smile if you believe all animals deserve=20
our respect and our protection, for in a way,=20
they are us, and we are them."
-Philip Ochoa Board Member, ALL FOR ANIMALS=20
  #2  
Old October 6th, 2003, 09:59 PM
bowgus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

Ok ... so lemme see if I understand your point. You are saying that fish
can be trained to come to my boat at the time of day of my choosing to feed?
I'm hooked ... :-)

"John" wrote in message
s.com...
Fish much smarter than we imagined

LUCY BANNERMAN October 02 2003


Copyright 2003 Newsquest (Herald & Times) Limited. All Rights
Reserved

FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.
"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.








"Man is the most dangerous, destructive, selfish,
and unethical animal on earth."
Michael W. Fox, Scientific Director and former
Vice President,
Humane Society of the United States.

"The life of an ant and that of my child
should be granted equal consideration,
for what does it really pain man to do so"
Pete Who. 2003

"Look deep into the eyes of any animal, and then
for a moment, trade places,
their life becomes as precious as yours and you
become as vulnerable as them.
Now smile if you believe all animals deserve
our respect and our protection, for in a way,
they are us, and we are them."
-Philip Ochoa Board Member, ALL FOR ANIMALS


  #3  
Old October 6th, 2003, 10:16 PM
Phil.L
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

John wrote:
: Fish much smarter than we imagined
:
: LUCY BANNERMAN October 02 2003
:
:
: Copyright 2003 Newsquest (Herald & Times) Limited. All Rights
: Reserved
:
: FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
: scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
: brains to find food themselves.
:
: Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
: shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
: In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
: goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
: to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
: findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
: hungry.
:
: Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
: of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
: The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
: they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
: Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
: experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
: He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
: time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
: enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
: then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
: hour was up.
:
: "It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
: circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
: that they are able to learn."
: It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
: world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
: equipment.
:
: Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
: return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
: fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
: European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
: at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
: The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
: is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
: regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
: conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
: were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
: Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
: FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
: scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
: brains to find food themselves.
:
: Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
: shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
: In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
: goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
: to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
: findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
: hungry.
:
: Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
: of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
: The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
: they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
: Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
: experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
: He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
: time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
: enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
: then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
: hour was up.
: "It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
: circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
: that they are able to learn."
: It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
: world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
: equipment.
:
: Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
: return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
: fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
: European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
: at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
: The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
: is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
: regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
: conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
: were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
: Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
: "Man is the most dangerous, destructive, selfish,
: and unethical animal on earth."
: Michael W. Fox, Scientific Director and former
: Vice President,
: Humane Society of the United States.
:
: "The life of an ant and that of my child
: should be granted equal consideration,
: for what does it really pain man to do so"
: Pete Who. 2003
:
: "Look deep into the eyes of any animal, and then
: for a moment, trade places,
: their life becomes as precious as yours and you
: become as vulnerable as them.
: Now smile if you believe all animals deserve
: our respect and our protection, for in a way,
: they are us, and we are them."
: -Philip Ochoa Board Member, ALL FOR ANIMALS

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.


just in case you didnt get it the first time this pile of ****e was sent in
duplicate.


  #4  
Old October 7th, 2003, 12:21 AM
Ray
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined


"Phil.L" wrote in message
...
John wrote:
: Fish much smarter than we imagined
:
: LUCY BANNERMAN October 02 2003
:
:
: Copyright 2003 Newsquest (Herald & Times) Limited. All Rights
: Reserved
:
: FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
: scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
: brains to find food themselves.
:
: Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
: shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
: In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
: goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
: to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
: findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
: hungry.
:
: Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
: of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
: The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
: they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
: Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
: experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
: He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
: time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
: enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
: then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
: hour was up.
:
: "It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
: circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
: that they are able to learn."
: It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
: world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
: equipment.
:
: Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
: return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
: fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
: European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
: at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
: The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
: is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
: regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
: conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
: were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
: Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
: FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
: scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
: brains to find food themselves.
:
: Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
: shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
: In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
: goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
: to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
: findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
: hungry.
:
: Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
: of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
: The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
: they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
: Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
: experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
: He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
: time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
: enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
: then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
: hour was up.
: "It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
: circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
: that they are able to learn."
: It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
: world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
: equipment.
:
: Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
: return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
: fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
: European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
: at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
: The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
: is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
: regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
: conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
: were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
: Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
: "Man is the most dangerous, destructive, selfish,
: and unethical animal on earth."
: Michael W. Fox, Scientific Director and former
: Vice President,
: Humane Society of the United States.
:
: "The life of an ant and that of my child
: should be granted equal consideration,
: for what does it really pain man to do so"
: Pete Who. 2003
:
: "Look deep into the eyes of any animal, and then
: for a moment, trade places,
: their life becomes as precious as yours and you
: become as vulnerable as them.
: Now smile if you believe all animals deserve
: our respect and our protection, for in a way,
: they are us, and we are them."
: -Philip Ochoa Board Member, ALL FOR ANIMALS

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry.

Over time, researchers adjusted the lever, reducing the availability
of food until it was dispensed for just one hour every day.
The scientists claim that as the fish adapted to their new routine
they became more attentive to the lever as feeding hour approached.
Rather than having a mere three-second memory, Mr Gee said the
experiment revealed that the aquatic brain knows when it is lunchtime.
He said: "The fish worked out that if they hit the lever around that
time, they would get food. Their activity around the lever increased
enormously just before the set hour when their food was dispensed. But
then, if no food came out, they stopped pressing the lever when the
hour was up.

"It shows that they are probably able to adapt to changes in their
circumstances, like any other small animals and birds. It tells us
that they are able to learn."
It is hoped the discovery could enable fish farmers in the developing
world to monitor their stocks without the need for expensive
equipment.

Studies in Norway have already found that fish can be trained to
return to a feeding area at a certain time after those released into a
fjord came back when they heard a particular sound.
European eel, meanwhile, are heading for extinction with populations
at just 1% of the level they were in 1980, researchers said yesterday.
The decline of the species is so dramatic that the European Commission
is expected to issue a directive within the next year aimed at
regulating the eel fishing industry and setting habitat standards for
conserving the remaining populations. Latest estimates of eel stocks
were presented last week at a meeting of the International Council for
Exploration of the Seas in Tallinn, Estonia.
FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.


just in case you didnt get it the first time this pile of ****e was sent

in
duplicate.

Hate to see it in triplicate - no don't.


  #5  
Old October 7th, 2003, 04:41 PM
mr natural
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined


"John" wrote in message
s.com...
Fish much smarter than we imagined

___________________
[...]

FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry. [...]
___________________


If Phil had bothered to ask any aquarist, they could have told him that fish
are easily conditioned. Indeed, even the shrimp and starfish in my reef
aquarium are conditioned. The things that the taxpayers' money get spent on
is mindboggling...



  #6  
Old October 7th, 2003, 05:09 PM
Richard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined


"mr natural" wrote in message
...

"John" wrote in message
s.com...
Fish much smarter than we imagined

___________________
[...]

FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry. [...]
___________________


If Phil had bothered to ask any aquarist, they could have told him that

fish
are easily conditioned. Indeed, even the shrimp and starfish in my reef
aquarium are conditioned. The things that the taxpayers' money get spent

on
is mindboggling...


Agreed ... they could have just come and seen the behaviour of the various
cold water species in my pond and saved theirselves a lot of time and tax
payers money .....

so why is it that anglers pre-bait (if allowed) lol

Who are these wallies that give these other wallies all this money of ours
to spend on pointless bloody work ?

Richard




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.521 / Virus Database: 319 - Release Date: 9/23/03


  #7  
Old October 7th, 2003, 05:33 PM
Ergo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

Richard wrote:
snip
Who are these wallies that give these other wallies all this money of
ours to spend on pointless bloody work ?

Richard


Probably those stupid Cods at Whitehall lol
--
Ergo
I am a self-made man.
A perfect example of unskilled labour 8-)


---
Don't worry I am virus free atm. rofl
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/03


  #8  
Old October 7th, 2003, 10:33 PM
Robb Nunya
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

On Tue, 7 Oct 2003 16:09:30 +0000 (UTC), "Richard"
scribed:


"mr natural" wrote in message
.. .

"John" wrote in message
s.com...
Fish much smarter than we imagined

___________________
[...]

FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry. [...]
___________________


If Phil had bothered to ask any aquarist, they could have told him that

fish
are easily conditioned. Indeed, even the shrimp and starfish in my reef
aquarium are conditioned. The things that the taxpayers' money get spent

on
is mindboggling...


Agreed ... they could have just come and seen the behaviour of the various
cold water species in my pond and saved theirselves a lot of time and tax
payers money .....

so why is it that anglers pre-bait (if allowed) lol

Who are these wallies that give these other wallies all this money of ours
to spend on pointless bloody work ?

Richard




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.521 / Virus Database: 319 - Release Date: 9/23/03


They're known as "Our elected representatives"

Sad isn't it?
  #9  
Old October 7th, 2003, 10:39 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dump Slater much stupider than was thought possible


  #10  
Old October 7th, 2003, 10:42 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fish much smarter than we imagined

On Tue, 07 Oct 2003 21:33:25 GMT, Robb Nunya
wrote:

On Tue, 7 Oct 2003 16:09:30 +0000 (UTC), "Richard"
scribed:


"mr natural" wrote in message
. ..

"John" wrote in message
s.com...
Fish much smarter than we imagined

___________________
[...]

FIRST they dismissed the three-second memory as a goldfish myth. Now
scientists say that as well as being brain food for us, fish use their
brains to find food themselves.

Research by Phil Gee, a psychologist from Plymouth University, has
shown that fish may not be the dunces of the food chain after all.
In a three-month experiment, his research team found they could train
goldfish to collect food at certain times of the day. Fish were taught
to nudge a lever that released food into their bowls. According to the
findings, the goldfish learned to push the lever when they were
hungry. [...]
___________________


If Phil had bothered to ask any aquarist, they could have told him that

fish
are easily conditioned. Indeed, even the shrimp and starfish in my reef
aquarium are conditioned. The things that the taxpayers' money get spent

on
is mindboggling...


Agreed ... they could have just come and seen the behaviour of the various
cold water species in my pond and saved theirselves a lot of time and tax
payers money .....

so why is it that anglers pre-bait (if allowed) lol

Who are these wallies that give these other wallies all this money of ours
to spend on pointless bloody work ?

Richard




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.521 / Virus Database: 319 - Release Date: 9/23/03


They're known as "Our elected representatives"

Sad isn't it?


No. It's what the majority of us want, the public, we do not like
animal abuse. You may well feel it OK to abuse animals in your cozy
little world, we don't, the majority rules.

Make the most of it while you can, it'll not last. If your conscience
doesn't prick you, society will force you.

Simple really.

If you really must fish, why not use magnetic fish in a bowl, sure
even you would have the mentality to work it out eventually?









. . . . . . . .





The facts expressed here belong to everybody,
the opinions to me.
The distinction is yours to draw...

/( )`
\ \___ / |
/- _ `-/ '
(/\/ \ \ /\
/ / | ` \
O O ) / |
`-^--'` '
(_.) _ ) /
`.___/` /
`-----' /
----. __ / __ \
----|====O)))==) \) /====
----' `--' `.__,' \
| |
\ /
______( (_ / \______
,' ,-----' | \
`--{__________) \/

I'm a horny devil when riled.


pete who?

-=[ Grim Reaper ]=- 6/97

.""--.._
[] `'--.._
||__ `'-,
`)||_ ```'--.. \
_ /|//} ``--._ |
.'` `'. /////} `\/
/ .""".\ //{///
/ /_ _`\\ // `||
| |(_)(_)|| _// ||
| | /\ )| _///\ ||
| |L====J | / |/ | ||
/ /'-..-' / .'` \ | ||
/ | :: | |_.-` | \ ||
/| `\-::.| | \ | ||
/` `| / | | | / ||
|` \ | / / \ | ||
| `\_| |/ ,.__. \ | ||
/ /` `\ || ||
| . / \|| ||
| | |/ ||
/ / | ( ||
/ . / ) ||
| \ | ||
/ | / ||
|\ / | ||
\ `-._ | / ||
\ ,//`\ /` | ||
///\ \ | \ ||
|||| ) |__/ | ||
|||| `.( | ||
`\\` /` / ||
/` / ||
jgs / | ||
| \ ||
/ | ||
/` \ ||
/` | ||
`-.___,-. .-. ___,' ||
`---'` `'----'`
I need a drink, feel all giddy...hic!
 




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