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Fishing After The Storm...



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 21st, 2005, 05:12 AM
Tex John
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Default Fishing After The Storm...

Alright, I live close to Houston and read recently that the day after a
hurricane is great fishing.

I don't have a boat but could hit a Surfside jetty after the surge receeded
and while the family was evac'ed to Austin.

Anyone have any personal experience with that? I'm used to bass that want to
wait a few days for things to settle down before they come out of their
holes...

Thanks,
John


  #2  
Old September 21st, 2005, 08:47 AM
Sarge
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Tex John wrote: "Alright, I live close to Houston and read recently that
the day after a hurricane is great fishing.
I don't have a boat but could hit a Surfside jetty after the surge receeded
and while the family was evac'ed to Austin.
Anyone have any personal experience with that? I'm used to bass that want to
wait a few days for things to settle down before they come out of their
holes..."

Storms stir up sediment which means more plankton is floating around which
gets eaten by smaller fish. The bait fish go on a feeding frenzy with so
much food supply. Then here comes the bigger fish on a frenzy to eat the
bait fish since they are more active.

You might have to change baits to match stained water conditions.

Sarge


  #3  
Old September 21st, 2005, 01:07 PM
Dan Logcher
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Sarge wrote:

Tex John wrote: "Alright, I live close to Houston and read recently that
the day after a hurricane is great fishing.
I don't have a boat but could hit a Surfside jetty after the surge receeded
and while the family was evac'ed to Austin.
Anyone have any personal experience with that? I'm used to bass that want to
wait a few days for things to settle down before they come out of their
holes..."

Storms stir up sediment which means more plankton is floating around which
gets eaten by smaller fish. The bait fish go on a feeding frenzy with so
much food supply. Then here comes the bigger fish on a frenzy to eat the
bait fish since they are more active.

You might have to change baits to match stained water conditions.


Weird. I'm fishing Cape Anne in Massachusetts and have the opposite
results after a storm. Striped bass don't seem to like the sediment
stir-up, and seemed to go out to sea to breathe better.

Before a storm is usually when the fish are feeding more heavily, like they
know its coming so they better get some eats.

--
Dan
  #4  
Old September 21st, 2005, 04:45 PM
Sarge
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Dan Logcher wrote: "Weird. I'm fishing Cape Anne in Massachusetts and have
the opposite results after a storm. Striped bass don't seem to like the
sediment stir-up, and seemed to go out to sea to breathe better.
Before a storm is usually when the fish are feeding more heavily, like they
know its coming so they better get some eats."

That is also true. When the barometric pressure starts dropping lighter
plankton float up in the water column. This increase the amount of plankton
in the water for bait fish to feed on. With the bait fish on a feeding
frenzy, the rest of the fish also go on a frenzy.

My earlier statement is also true. Fish move out to cleaner water when the
storm passes. Some fish do not have the ability to leave any area.
Stripers move out because the upper layers of the water column clear up
while the bottoms may still be stirred. I my area we don't have strippers
but do have specks and redfish. Specks want clean water but still can be
found in stained water. Reds on the other hand will stay put eating
everything. When fishing after a storm one must change their fishing
tactics to meet conditions.

This may mean changing baits or switching to live baits.

Sarge


  #5  
Old September 21st, 2005, 06:30 PM
Les Stewart
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"Tex John" wrote in message
...
Alright, I live close to Houston and read recently that the day after a
hurricane is great fishing.


I think you will have better luck today or tomorrow before the storm. The
storm will push green water inshore starting soon. I have done extremely
well in this situation, 1 or 2 days before a storm or at the edge of one.
The key is the high green water close in.

After the storm there will probably be a lot of dirty fresh water for a few
days from the turbulence, rain and runoff. I have had no luck the couple of
times I tried after a storm.

"For every theory there is an equal and opposite theory"
--
Les Stewart
Beaumont, TX


  #6  
Old September 21st, 2005, 09:59 PM
Rodney
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Sarge wrote:
Reds on the other hand will stay put eating
everything. When fishing after a storm one must change their fishing
tactics to meet conditions.

After a hurricane, fish the surge draining from inlets and bays, or
coves, fish on the beach side, the red's stack up here in these passes
for days, feeding on everything coming out. After Opel, my wife and I
caught hundreds of reds, fishing the west pass at Gulf Sores, as the
surge drained from the lagoon. were were using finger mullet caught with
a cast net right at the discharge. a mullet would not last 30 sec. once
it hit the bottom. Most of the reds were 20 to 30 inches, boy we had a
blast,, and the game warden made the state a fortune, writing tickets
for all those people stupid enough to have kept more than the daily limit

--
Rodney Long,
Inventor of the Long Shot "WIGGLE" rig, SpecTastic Thread
Boomerang Fishing Pro. ,Stand Out Hooks ,Stand Out Lures,
Mojo's Rock Hopper & Rig Saver weights, Decoy Activator
and the EZKnot http://www.ezknot.com
  #7  
Old September 25th, 2005, 01:12 AM
Tex John
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Default

The book I read that in was by AC Becker, an old timer, and he WAS talking
about Redfish.

The striper response...that's a bass and my experience is bass is like
freshwater trout: wait 3 days after the storm.

And, yeah, specs want clean water.

Ugh...we not only didn't get a storm surge here, it actually blew the water
out of our west side of Galveston AND my starter blew up yesterday and no
parts stores are open. Oh well, probably couldn't get on a jetty anyway
since most of those beach towns are closed and there's only one road to the
coast every 50 miles or so...pretty easy for the cops to keep them blocked
off.

John
in Sugarland, Texas


"Sarge" wrote in message
...
Tex John wrote: "Alright, I live close to Houston and read recently that
the day after a hurricane is great fishing.
I don't have a boat but could hit a Surfside jetty after the surge

receeded
and while the family was evac'ed to Austin.
Anyone have any personal experience with that? I'm used to bass that want

to
wait a few days for things to settle down before they come out of their
holes..."

Storms stir up sediment which means more plankton is floating around which
gets eaten by smaller fish. The bait fish go on a feeding frenzy with so
much food supply. Then here comes the bigger fish on a frenzy to eat the
bait fish since they are more active.

You might have to change baits to match stained water conditions.

Sarge




  #8  
Old February 18th, 2011, 07:36 PM
dennaymorison dennaymorison is offline
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First recorded activity by FishingBanter: Feb 2011
Posts: 5
Default

I think you will have better luck before the storm today or tomorrow. Coastal storm will drive the green water is about to begin. I have done very well in this case, 1 or 2 days before the storm or edge of one. The key is closely inches tall green water.
  #9  
Old June 25th, 2011, 12:15 AM
anddyrogers anddyrogers is offline
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by FishingBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5
Default

I caught hundreds of reds, fishing the west canyon at Gulf Sores, as the surge drained from the lagoon. were were application feel mullet bent with a casting net appropriate at the discharge. a mullet would not endure 30 sec. once it hit the bottom.
 




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